Where can I locate research funding opportunities? How do I develop a competitive proposal? Where do I find the UD data I need to complete my budget? You’ll find the answers here, courtesy of the Research Office. A handy proposal checklist also is provided for your convenience.

Remember, it takes time and effort to develop a successful proposal — in fact, proposal success rates average 20–33%, depending on the field. Funding agencies reject half the proposals they receive because the applicant did not follow instructions or the proposal did not match the funding program.

However, the rewards for garnering research funding can be great, enabling you to explore new frontiers, instruct your students in the conduct of research, and yield new discoveries and knowledge of benefit to society.

*All proposals submitted to external sponsors from the University of Delaware, regardless of the amount, source of funding or the type of project must be reviewed and approved by the Research Office in accordance with UD policy External Sponsorship and Grant. In order for a proposal to be submitted, a proposal record must be created in the UD grants module system in order to originate a proposal approval form to route for approval of the proposal submission.

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PROPOSAL DEVELOPMENT

Institutional Information

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NIH Proposal Checklist

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Proposal Info/Checklist

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Proposal Writing

Institutional Information

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Institutional Information
Animal Welfare Assurance Number
D16-00457
Cognizant Federal Agency
Office of Naval Research (ONR)
Beth A. Snyder
703.696.5755

Congressional District
DE-001
DHHS Human Subjects Assurance Number
FWA00004379
E-mail for Electronic Award Notifications
Federal Interagency Commission on Education (FICE) Number
001431
Fiscal Officer’s Title
Vice Pres, Rsch Schlrp & Innov
Indirect Cost Agreement Date
07/01/2006
Indirect Cost Rate Type
Predetermined
IPES SID Number
1000170
Misconduct in Research, Latest Annual Report
02/07/2005
North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) code
611310
PHS Entity Number
1516000297A1
State of Delaware Organizational Code
90-01-01
University IRS Number
51-6000297
University of Delaware Commercial and Governmental Entity Code (CAGE)
015X1
University of Delaware Date of Incorporation
02/05/1833
University of Delaware DUNS Number
05-900-7500
University of Delaware Fiscal Officer
Dr. Charles Riordan
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NIH Proposal Checklist

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NIH Proposal Checklist

ComponentReq'dOpt'lNotes
SF424 RR
Remember to use 9 digit zip codes.
Remember standard start dates apply for NIH.
Field 11, Descriptive Title, is limited to 200 characters.
Field 15, auto filled based on data entered into the RR Budget or PHS 398 Modular Budget.
Field 19, Authorized Representative, email should always be udelaware-awards@udel.edu. Authorized representative is determined by first year total costs.
Field 21, Cover Letter Attachment, NIH strongly encourages a cover letter.
RR Performance Sites
If 50% or more of the work will happen off-site, UD cannot claim F&A expenses under the standard rate. The off-campus F&A rate will apply.
RR Other Project Information
Complete questions 1-6. Proposals that indicate use of human subjects are required to complete the PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information.
Proposals that indicate use of animals are required to submit Vertebrate Animals section. See PHS 398 Research Plan for more information.
ATTACHMENTS

  1. Project Summary/Abstract (limited to 30 lines of text)
  2. Project Narrative (limited to a couple sentences)
  3. Bibliography
  4. Facilities & Other Resources
  5. Equipment
  6. Other Attachments should only be included when required by the solicitation.

RR Key Persons
PI(s)/PD(s) must have eRA Commons Credential
ATTACHMENTS

  1. Biographical Sketch w/ Credential (5 pages unless the solicitation says otherwise; sometimes it is 2 pages)
    1. Education Block (Chronological order)
    2. Section A: Personal Statement (May include up to 4 peer reviewed publications)
    3. Section B: Positions & Honors (Chronological order – current position should be last in the list)
    4. Section C: Contributions to Science (May include up to 5 contributions of up to ½ page each. Within each contribution, you may include up to 4 peer reviewed publications or research products relevant to the contribution. Option to provide a URL to a full list of published work also.)
    5. Section D: Research Support (Include ongoing and completed support within the last 3 years. Begin with projects most relevant to the proposed research. Do not include person months or direct costs.)
  2. Current/Pending Support (not required unless it is mentioned in the solicitation. C&P is typically part of Just In Time information (JIT).)

NIH Salary Cap
Salary must not exceed NIH cap for faculty Salary cap summary: https://grants.nih.gov/grants/policy/salcap_summary.htm or graduate students cannot exceed the “0 Level Post Doc” stipend rate, inclusive of stipend, fringe, and tuition. On the budget justification, include a statement indicating the PI/Other Personnel (as appropriate) are budgeted at the NIH Salary Cap.
RR Budget
(*Use when required or allowed by the solicitation)
Typically used when direct costs exceed $250,000 per year (excluding subaward(s) F&A). If this type of budget is used and you have subawards in your budget, you will also need to complete the RR Subaward Budget Attachment.

ATTACHMENTS
  1. Budget Justification for all requested costs.
PHS Human Subjects and Clinical Trials Information
(*Required when research involves human subjects.)
PHS398 Modular Budget
(*Use when required or allowed by the solicitation)
Modular budgets are applicable to certain research grant applications requesting direct costs of $250,000 or less per year (excluding subaward(s) F&A). The modular budget is applicable only to R01/U01, R03, R15, R21/UH2, R34/U34, and R15/UA5 applications.

For all modular budgets, request total direct costs (in modules of $25,000 up to $250,000), reflecting appropriate support for the project. There will be no future year escalations (see above SF424 Budget for explanation).
ATTACHMENTS
  1. Personnel Justification - include the name, role, and number of person-months devoted to this project for every person on the project. Do not include salary and fringe benefit rate in the justification.
  2. Consortium Justification - include the total costs (direct costs plus F&A costs), rounded to the nearest $1,000, for each consortium/subcontract. Additionally, any personnel should include their roles and person months; if the consortium is foreign, that should be stated as well.
  3. Additional Narrative Justification - include explanations for any variations in the number of modules requested annually. Also, this section should describe any direct costs that were excluded from the total direct costs (such as equipment, tuition remission) and any work being conducted off-site, especially if it involves a foreign study site or an off-site F&A rate.

RR Subaward Budget Attachment
Only required when using RR Budget not PHS398 Modular Budget. Complete RR Performance Sites and RR Key Persons forms. Check “Include in Prime” as appropriate.
Complete RR Budget Form and upload the subaward’s budget justification.
PHS398 Cover Page Supplement
PHS398 Research Plan
(Not required for Career Development Award (K) or Institutional Training Award (T) applications.)
Research Strategy should address (1) Significance, (2) Innovation, and (3) Approach.
ATTACHMENTS

  1. Introduction to Application – only required for Resubmission and Revision applications.
  2. Specific Aims (limited to 1 page)
  3. Research Strategy (limited to 6– 12 pages) – See http://grants.nih.gov/grants/forms_page_limits.htm for full list of page limitations.
  4. Progress Report Publication List – only required for Resubmission and Revision applications.
  5. Vertebrate Animals – to be completed when RR Other Project Information indicates use of animals.
  6. Select Agent Research
  7. Multiple PD/PI Leadership Plan
  8. Consortium/Contractual Arrangements – Upload a letter of intent signed by an Authorized Representative of the subawardee organization.
  9. Letters of Support

  10. Resource Sharing Plan – only required under certain circumstances. See NIH GPG Part I Section 5.5.
  11. Authentication of Key Biological and/or Chemical Resources—required if Biological and/or Chemical Resources will be used. 1 page is suggested. A negative statement is not required.
  12. Appendix - Maximum of 10 allowable appendices. See NIH Notice Number: NOT-OD-18-126 for updated list of allowable appendix materials.

PHS Assignment Request
PHS398 Career Development Award Supplemental Form
(Required only for Career Development Award (K).)
Letters of reference required.
PHS398 Research Training Program Plan
(Required only for Institutional Training Award (T).)
PHS398 Training Budget
(*Use when required or allowed by the FOA)
PHS398 Training Subaward Budget Attachment
(*Use when required or allowed by the FOA)

 

FeatureNotes
Font Use an Arial, Helvetica, Palatino Linotype, or Georgia typeface are recommended, although other fonts (both serif and non-serif) are acceptable. Font size must be 11 points or larger. (A Symbol font may be used to insert Greek letters or special characters; the font size requirement still applies.)
Type DensityType density, including characters and spaces, must be no more than 15 characters per inch. Type may be no more than six lines per vertical inch.
Paper Size and MarginsUse standard paper size (8 ½" x 11). Use at least one-half inch margins (top, bottom, left, and right) for all pages. No applicant-supplied information can appear in the margins.
Page FormattingUse only a standard, single-column format for the text. Do not include any information in a header or footer of the attachments, including page numbers.
Text Color
No restriction, although black and other high-contrast text colors are recommended since they print well and are legible to the largest audience.
Figures, Graphs, Diagrams, Charts, Tables, Figure Legends, and FootnotesYou may use a smaller type size but it must be readily legible and follow the font typeface requirement.
Proposal AttachmentsAll proposal attachments should be in PDF form. File names can contain the following: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, underscore, hyphen, space, period, parenthesis, curly braces, square brackets, tilde, exclamation point, comma, semi colon, apostrophe, at sign, number sign, dollar sign, percent sign, plus sign, and equal sign. NIH recommends avoiding the use of ampersand. Filenames must be 50 characters or less (including any spaces between words) and you can only have single spaces between words in filenames. 
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Proposal Info/Checklist

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Proposal Information

This form is provided as a guide to use when preparing a proposal for submission through the Research Office. Download Proposal Information Form.

 

Proposal Checklist

To process a proposal, Research Office requires the following items:

  1. Fully approved FIN Proposal Approval Summary Web form with necessary attachments
  2. Statement of Work and/or Abstract
  3. Detailed Budget AND Budget Justification being presented to the sponsor
  4. Subawards are awards provided by a pass-through entity to a subrecipient for the subrecipient to carry out part of a Federal award received by the pass-through entity. It does not include payments to a contractor or payments to an individual that is a beneficiary of a Federal program. A subaward may be provided through any form of legal agreement, including an agreement that the pass-through entity considers a contract.

    When UD’s Proposal Includes a Subaward for an Investigator at Another Institution

    ITEMS REQUIRED FROM SUBRECIPIENTS FOR A UD PROPOSAL:
    1. Look up the institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database located at: https://fdpclearinghouse.org/organizations
    2. Obtain the items listed in the applicable table below, depending on whether or not the subrecipient institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse (see below for explanation).

       

      Necessary Documents for Subaward Contracts
      Table A Table B
      MEMBER OF FDP Expanded Clearinghouse* NOT A MEMBER of FDP Expanded Clearinghouse*
    3. Include the above items as Attachments to the proposal in the UD Financials Grants System

    When UD is a Subrecipient in a Proposal Being Submitted by Another Institution

    1. Look up the other institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database located at: https://fdpclearinghouse.org/organizations
    2. If the institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse:
      1. Attach a completed UD FDP Letter of Intent to the Attachments Tab of the UD proposal when routed for internal approvals, to be signed by the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator.
      2. Do not complete a Subrecipient Information form for the other institution. If they request that you do, politely remind them that UD is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse (other institution can obtain UD’s data from the Clearinghouse).
    3. If the institution is not a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse:
      1. Attach a completed UD non-FDP Subaward Cover Letter to the Attachments Tab of the UD proposal when routed for internal approvals, to be signed by the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator.
      2. The other institution may request that we complete their Subrecipient Information form.

    Federal Demonstration Project (FDP) Expanded Clearinghouse Participation

    UD is a member of the FDP, a non-profit organization comprised of Universities and other research institutions along with representatives of several research-oriented Federal Agencies. Among other activities, the FDP develops tools for its members to streamline the administration of research. One of those tools is the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, a nation-wide database containing institutional profiles and data of 200+ member institutions. The member institutions agree to obtain the institutional data needed to prepare subrecipient agreements from this database rather than requiring each other to prepare administrative informational forms for every proposal they jointly submit. This saves a great deal of administrative work for all of the participating institutions and provides them with an easily accessible, up-to-date source of this data.

     

    1. Who determines if the other institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
        The Department Administrator or PI looks up the other institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database when preparing the proposal.
    2. Where do I get a user ID and password for the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
        You do not need a user ID or password to be able to access the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse data.
    3. How do I let the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator know that the subaward institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
        Attach the other institution’s FDP-style Letter of Intent to the UD Financials Grant proposal.
    4. Do I need to send UD’s Letter of Intent template (LOI) to the other institution for them to complete?
        Maybe. Member institutions are likely to have their own institution’s LOI to use for proposals with other member institutions. However, you can send them UD’s LOI to use as a sample if they ask for one.
    5. Does the other institution’s Letter of Intent (LOI) need to follow the same format as UD’s FDP LOI?
        No, but, it should provide essentially the same project-specific information, it should not request completion of data that can be obtained from the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, and it should be signed by the Authorized Official for the subrecipient institution.
    6. What do I do if another FDP Expanded Clearinghouse member institution asks me to complete their Subrecipient Commitment Form?
        Politely inform them that UD is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse and that you will provide them with a signed FDP Letter of Intent instead.
    7. When UD is a subrecipient under an institution that is not a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, can I send them a UD FDP Letter of Intent?
        Yes.
    8. Who uses the Letter of Intent (LOI)?
        The LOI is intended for internal use to represent institutional endorsement of the proposed subaward budget and scope of work by the Subrecipient’s Authorized Official. It is not designed to meet any specific sponsor’s proposal requirements, although it may be used in the proposal submitted to the sponsor if desired. The wording of the LOI may be altered slightly to add sponsor-specific requirements if it is acceptable to both institutions.
  5. Program Solicitation
  6. Any forms and/or sponsor certifications that require Research Office signature
  7. Conflict of Interest form must be in good standing at the time of submission (see Conflict of Interest (COI) Policy and Web COI Form)

Items 2, 3, and 4 can be attached in the Attachments tab of the UD Grants System (PeopleSoft 8.9) and will appear on the web form. (If any item is too large to be attached to the UD Grants system please use the UD Drop Box.)

Other items that can be attached to the Documents section:

  1. Any notes/information on cost sharing – please see Third Party Cost Share Documentation.
  2. Human Subject, Recombinant DNA, Radiation, and Animal Use Protocol approvals Work
  3. The full proposal
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Proposal Writing

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Proposal Writing Resources

 

BUDGETS & RATES

Budget Categories

Budget Justification Guidelines

Budget Justification Template

Budget Salary- DHHS Caps

Budget Categories

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Budget Categories

Proposal budgets are itemized by budget categories. The categories map to accounts when the proposal is awarded. Use this budget category list to guide the proposal budget process.

 

Budget CategoriesAccount
OSPRPER120200
OTPROF120400
STPOST120800
SRPERS121100
PERSON121800
GRADFL122700
CLERK123000
OTPERS125200
UNDERAD126000
FRINGE129000
TRAVEL130000
OTHER140000
SUPL140000
CONSLT146000
SHIP146800
PTSUBS (Participant Support Non Empl)146100
PTTRAV (Participant Support Vendor146190
CMES Ship Charges MTDC146800
PARTINC (Participant Incentive149250
PBLCTN148300
TUITIO149000
OCMNT150000
SUB<25153200
SUB>25153300
RENTAL154200
RVSHARP Operations Billings155200
EQUIP160000
COMPTR170000
FACADM195000

 

Budget Justification Guidelines

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Budget Justification Guidelines

For all personnel working on the project (PIs, Co-PIs, Graduate Students, Undergraduate Students, Post Docs, etc.), include a brief description of their role in the project and the amount of effort in person months committed. Include the annual rate of the salary increase.

NOTE: Undergraduate Students- If it is anticipated that the student will be enrolled less than half time or if they will work in the summer, fringe benefits (at the miscellaneous wage rate) should be budgeted and the rate should be stated. Graduate students can only work 20 hours per week per University policy. For the most recent undergraduate rates, check with your department administrator.

There are two classifications of Post Docs at UD: Post Doctoral Researchers and Post Doctoral Fellows. A Post Doctoral Fellow designation is used for individuals primarily doing research as independent learners and are not assigned to projects as employees. A Post Doctoral Fellow is viewed as a nonemployee by the IRS. A Post Doctoral Researcher designation is used for researchers who are here primarily assigned to projects as employees for a limited period of time after obtaining their doctorate degrees. Post Doctoral Researchers receive fringe benefits (faculty/professional rate) and Post Doctoral Fellows receive no fringe benefits. For more information on the difference between these two designations, read the Proposal Guide FAQ, No. 6.

Administrative Salaries (see § 200.413): These costs should normally be treated as indirect (F&A) costs. Direct charging these may be appropriate if all of the following conditions are met:

  1. Administrative/clerical services are integral to a project or activity
  2. Individual(s) involved can be specifically identified with the project or activity
  3. Costs are explicitly included in the budget or have the prior written approval of the Federal awarding agency
  4. The Costs are not also recovered as indirect costs

Fringe benefits should be charged in accordance with UD’s negotiated rate. The most current rate can be found on the Research Office website here.

This category includes items of special purpose equipment equal to or greater than $5,000 and having a useful life of one year. In this section, include details such as the type of equipment, cost, and a brief narrative on the intended use of the equipment. If multiple pieces of equipment are included, list the corresponding cost of each unit. Special purpose equipment are allowable as direct costs with prior written approval of the Federal awarding agency or pass-through entity.

NOTE: F&A is not calculated on equipment costs. Software is not considered to be equipment (even if over $5,000) and should be listed in Materials and Supplies.

Equipment Fabrication: Fabricated equipment means materials purchased for the purpose of building, constructing or assembling a piece of equipment that will be identified as equipment with the final cost being at least $5,000 or more and have a useful life of one year when completed. Include the same information above for fabricated equipment. F&A is not calculated on equipment fabrication.

Computer Nodes: Computer nodes are considered equipment if the nodes are purchased and added to an existing computer cluster to give PIs access to the cluster. Clusters are existing pieces of equipment and when nodes are purchased, we are adding items to existing pieces of equipment that are more than $2,000 (in most cases). Adding nodes to a computer cluster gives PIs the ability to access massive amounts of space and horsepower on the cluster. If a PI needs access to an existing cluster to complete their work due to a need to access large amounts of space and horsepower, the nodes should be budgeted as equipment.

Note: If a PI would like to use the existing cluster without purchasing nodes, this would not be equipment; this should be budgeted as ‘Other’ or ‘Service’. In addition, if a PI intends to purchase nodes to use in their office (not part of the cluster), this should be budgeted as supplies (in most cases) since the PI would be purchasing a large computer (unless it was over $5,000).

Include all travel paid directly by the sponsor, including both foreign and/or domestic travel. It’s best to provide the following information: destination (if known), purpose of the travel, number of travelers, airfare, ground transportation, lodging, and meals/per diem (use GSA Rates). If traveling by vehicle include the number of miles and the current GSA mileage rate.

Note: If travel is in excess of 6 months, dependent care costs can be requested with prior approval.

Foreign travel includes a destination that requires a passport. If international travel occurs on a Federal award, Fly America must be followed. For more information see: Fly America Act. Complete the Fly America Checklist at the time the expense is made.

Participant support costs are payments provided to a study participant or to a workshop attendee. These are payments FROM the grant to an individual or vendor on behalf of the individual (but not employees). These costs are expressed as non‐salary expenses for items such as stipends or subsistence allowances, travel allowances, and registration fees in connection with meetings, conferences, symposia, or training projects. These costs are allowable with the prior approval of the awarding agency.

In the justification, include the number of participants and cost per item (ex: stipend, travel/subsistence allowance, etc.)

NOTE: F&A is not calculated on participant support costs. More information can be found at: here.

List an explanation for each ODC with an explanation of the cost and the dollar amount. Common ODC include:

 
  1. Materials and Supplies – May include items such as software, educational or field supplies, and laboratory supplies such as chemicals, reagents, and glassware. Include a brief justification of why the material/supply is needed.
  2. Publication Costs – May include costs associated with the publishing of an article in a scientific/technical journal or other type of field/program publication, brochures, or program materials. If applicable, include student poster presentation costs.
  3. Consultants - A consultant is an individual (work-for-hire) with proven professional or technical competence, which is provided to the organization. The consultant cannot be affiliated with UD. Include the name of the consultant, his/her organization, a statement of work, and a breakdown of the amount being charged to the project (ex: number of days of service, rate of pay, travel, per diem, etc.).

    NOTE: F&A is calculated on consultants.

  4. Computational Devices: Computing devices means machines used to acquire, store, analyze, process, and publish data and other information electronically, including accessories (or “peripherals”) for printing, transmitting and receiving, or storing electronic information. Charging computing devices as direct costs is allowable for devices that are essential and allocable, but not solely dedicated, to the performance of a Federal award.
  5. Subawards (Also called Consortium or Contractual Costs) – A Subaward performs substantive programmatic work under a grant or contract and bears responsibility for programmatic decision making and measurable performance requirements. A justification for the subaward should include the same level of detail as your budget justification per itemized cost category.

    NOTE: F&A is only calculated on the first $25,000 of a subaward’s total budget. If you have multiple subawards in your budget, F&A will be calculated on the first $25,000 of each subaward.

    Fixed Amount Subawards (See §200.332) – With prior written approval from the Federal Agency, pass through entity may provide subawards based on fixed amounts up to the Simplified Acquisition Threshold ($150,000), providing that the Subawards meet the requirement for fixed amount awards (See §200.201).

  6. Tuition – Tuition will be charged to all grants and contracts at a rate of 20% of the total graduate tuition per the Graduate Tuition Policy found here. Exceptions to this Policy may be granted by the PI’s dean when the total funding available to the PI(s) for the project is less than $75,000 per year or in cases wherein the funding organization has a written policy precluding charging of graduate tuition to awards, and should be documented in the proposal approval routing form Current tuition rates can be found here. Include annual percent increase in the justification.

    Note: F&A is not calculated on tuition costs

  7. Equipment Rental/Facility Rentals/User Fees -
    1. Equipment Rental – When there is a need to rent equipment for use on the project, provide the type of equipment to be rented, the purpose or use on the project, the length of time needed, and the rental rate.
    2. Facility Rental – When it is necessary to rent office or other facilities spaces for project implementation, and the space(s) are located off-site from the organization’s main facility space not owned by the recipient organization, the cost of the rent may be charged against the award if the space is used specifically for the project. Include the monthly rental and/or prorated rate. For laboratory facilities, provide a letter signed by an Authorizing Representative of the rented space attesting their agreement to allow the project to operate in the space.
    3. Land-Use Charges – When there is a charge for using land owned by others for project purposes, provide the charge per acre (or other rate charged), number of acres, and total cost.
    4. User Fees – Include the type of service being charged (ex: MRI, DBI, or NMR fees), how it relates to the project, and an explanation and breakdown of the costs.
      1. If DBI facility costs are budgeted as a direct cost, a justification for these costs should be included. There is a separate justification for DBI experiment use and DBI computer work only. See the justification template for the minimum suggested DBI facility language.
  8. Memberships, subscriptions and professional activity costs (See §200.454) — Costs of an entity’s (UD’s) membership in business, technical, professional organizations/periodicals are allowable. Costs of (individual) memberships in civic or community organizations are allowable with prior approval by the Federal awarding agency or pass through entity. Membership must be allocable and programmatically related to the project.
  9. Other – For other costs not specifically listed above. Identify and provide details of the costs involved. Some of the more common items included in this category are:
    1. Communication Costs – Include mailings, postage, survey supplies, faxes, and telephone long distance charges that are directly related to the project and are above and beyond normal business use.
    2. Photocopying – Include in-house photocopying of materials that are directly related to the project and are above and beyond normal business use.
    3. Service or Maintenance Contracts – These costs should be in direct correlation to the use of the equipment for the project and the performance period (ex: if an instrument is used 50% of the time for the project, only 50% of the service/maintenance costs may be charged to the project. A 5-year service contract cannot be charged to a 3-year award). Include service contract details, amount, and length of the service contract.
    4. Conferences/Meetings – Include costs of holding a conference or meeting. Some examples include rental of facilities and equipment for the meeting, translator, A/V fees, honorariums/fees for trainers or guest speakers, and travel and/or per diem costs for speakers. Itemize conference/meeting costs and include the amounts of each cost in the justification.
    Meals: Meal costs (non‐travel) may be directly charged on a grant/contract if it is part of a formal meeting or conference where technical information, directly related to the award, is being disseminated. For more information regarding direct charging meals to an award, read this document.

    NOTE: Participant support costs do not belong in this category. See guidance above for participant support costs. For guest speaker/trainer fees, include fee/rate and a description of the services provided.

  10. Housing, housing allowances and personal living expenses (See §200.445) — These costs are allowable as direct costs with prior approval of the Federal awarding agency. Examples of such costs include depreciation, maintenance, utilities, furnishings, and rent.
  11. Entertainment Costs (See §200.438) — Entertainment costs (amusement, diversion, and social activities) are unallowable unless they have a programmatic purpose and are authorized either in the approved budget for the Federal award or with prior written approval of the Federal awarding agency.
  12. Exchange Rates Fluctuation (See §200.440) — Cost increases for fluctuation in exchange rates are allowable with prior approval of the Federal awarding agency. If the PI anticipates working with foreign entities, include funds to cover foreign exchange rates.

    NOTE: At the time the expense is made, include documentation from a commonly used source (Ex: Oanda, XE, etc). Also see travel tools on UD Procurement website.

If the sponsor allows indirect costs, include the percentage rate used, Fiscal Year, and list exclusions from indirect costs. Include the link to UD’s negotiated rate agreement.

The same level of detail required for sponsor (Federal or Non-Federal) funds should be provided for any required cost-sharing/matching. Cost-sharing/matching that is not required should not be included on the budget.

Any cost-share/match commitments by a 3rd Party organization must include a letter signed by the contributing organization’s Authorizing Representative. The letter should state whether the costshare/match is cash or in-kind, the amount of cost-share/match, and the purpose/use of the costshare/match. If cost-share/match is required by the sponsor, describe the cost-share/match in the budget justification.

For additional information regarding UD’s cost-share/match policy, see here.

Program Income is earned income to defray the program costs of the award. With prior approval of the Federal awarding agency, program income may be added to the Federal award. Program income must be used for the purposes and under the conditions of the Federal award. With prior approval of the Federal awarding agency, program income may be used to meet the cost sharing requirement of the Federal award; however, the amount of the Federal award remains the same.

Budget Justification Template

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Budget Justification Template

Budget Justification Template (PDF)
Budget Justification Template (Word)

Budget Salary- DHHS Caps

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Budgeting Salary-DHHS Caps

Instructions for budgeting salary on DHHS proposals for employees with salaries over the DHHS salary cap:

Departments are responsible for ensuring that employees are paid in accordance with all sponsor policies, terms and conditions, including any salary limitations they may impose. The National Institutes of Health (NIH), as well as certain other operating components within the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) are legislatively required to impose a cap on salaries that can be paid from the funds awarded by those agencies. The salary cap is usually adjusted on an annual basis and the current salary limit should be determined by consulting the Salary Cap Summary on the NIH website when developing budgets1.

Salaries for employees whose Institutional Base Salary (IBS) exceed the DHHS salary cap should be budgeted using the cap amount and include a statement in the budget justification indicating that the salary has been budgeted at the cap. The amount of the employee’s salary that exceeds the DHHS cap must be funded from non-sponsored sources. No sponsored project may be used to cover the difference in salary between the cap and the actual salary amount.

In order to document that the salary cap is not being exceeded and the full amount of committed effort is being provided, the difference between the employee’s actual Institutional Base Salary (IBS) and the cap must be shown as cost-sharing in the PeopleSoft budget. While these charges must be coded in the same manner as cost-share in order to be recognized as effort applied to the grant, they do not constitute true cost-share because payments above the cap are unallowable for the grant. Reducing the amount of salary requested from the sponsor or reducing the committed effort percent does not affect the need to cost-share the amount over the cap. Because the individual is receiving salary that exceeds the allowed annual salary, every dollar of effort for that individual is comprised of the portion of his/her salary that can be directly charged to the award plus the portion that must be paid from another non-sponsored source as “salary cap cost-share.”

1Operating divisions within the DHHS that are subject to the salary cap include but are not limited to: the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). The cap is mandated by Congress in the annual federal appropriation to DHHS and as such the components of DHHS to which it applies may change from time to time. It is therefore prudent to check the policy of the component of DHHS that is awarding the grant to determine if the salary cap applies. For assistance, contact your Contract and Grant Administrator in the Research Office.

To determine if a salary is over the cap
Since the DHHS salary cap is based on a 12 month salary, we must annualize the employee’s salary to determine if the employee’s salary exceeds the cap. For example, if an employee’s full time salary for a nine month contract is $170,000, you annualize the salary by dividing it by 9 and then multiplying by 12 ($170K/9*12=$226,667). If the employee’s annualized salary amount is greater than the salary cap amount, his/her salary is over the cap. When this is the case, you must determine how much of the salary can be direct charged to the federal award and how much must be cost-shared on a non-sponsored source.

To calculate salary allocation splits
The portion of effort which can be charged to the grant = effort * salary cap/annualized salary. The portion which must be recorded as cost-share = effort * (1 – (salary cap/annualized salary)).

Example: A PI has an annualized salary of $226,667, the applicable salary cap is $185,100, and the PI has committed 25% effort to the project. How much of the 25% effort can be charged to the grant and how much must be recorded as cost-share?

The portion of salary which can be charged to the grant:
0.25 * 185,100/226,667 = 20.4%

The portion of salary which must be cost-shared from non-sponsored source(s):
0.25 * (1 – (185,100/226,667)) = 4.6%

How to enter in the proposal budget:

The percent of the employee’s effort being committed to the proposed project is not the same as the percent of the salary cost being direct charged to the award funds. The effort being committed to the project by the employee is the sum of the percent of the salary direct-costed to the award + the percent paid as cost-share. The breakdown into the two percentages allocated to each funding source is not specified in the proposal budget or budget justification.

Example: 20.4% from award funds + 4.6% from cost-share funds = 25% effort from all sources
The proposal budget and budget justification should show 25% effort (3 months effort) However, the dollar amount budgeted in the Sponsor’s proposal budget for the employee’s committed effort should be the amount that will be direct costed on the award only.

Example:
25% effort committed to this proposal for this employee. Only 25% of the salary cap can be budgeted in the Sponsor’s proposal budget. Salary requested in the budget = the salary cap * committed effort = $185,100 * 0.25 = $46,275

Questions?
Please contact the Research Office Assoc Director, Post Award Adm, Michele Conlin.

Administrative Salaries

Equipment

Facilities & Administrative (F&A)

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Fixed Fringe Benefit Rates

Administrative Salaries

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Administrative Salaries

Administrative salaries as direct charges to federal or federal flow through awards. Administrative salaries should normally be treated as indirect costs but at times may be appropriate as direct charges if certain conditions are met (2 CFR 200.413):

  • Integral to a project or activity
  • Individual(s) involved can be specifically identified with the project or activity
  • Costs are included in proposal budget and awarded by sponsor or have prior written approval from sponsor
  • Costs are not also recovered as indirect costs

Salaries that are determined to be administrative and meet the criteria above must be budgeted accordingly in the UD financial system. For exempt administrative staff, the budget category to use in the People Soft proposal is ADMEXEMPT and for non-exempt administrative staff the budget category to use in People Soft is CLERK.

For exempt administrative staff the budget ps account to use is 120000. The individual should be paid from the appropriate salary expense ps account. For non-exempt administrative staff the budget ps account to use is 123000 with the appropriate salary expense ps account used for expenses.

Budget Category Budget PS Account Expense PS Account
CLERK 123000 123XXX
ADMEXEMPT 120000 120XXX

If administrative salaries were not included in proposal submission and funds awarded by the sponsor, you will need prior approval from the federal or federal flow through sponsor before you allocate administrative salary expenditures to the award.

Revisions to sponsored project budgets that require sponsor prior approval must be reviewed and approved by the Research Office. Once approval is received from the sponsor, if the budget revision is to be done within one project a FIN Budget Revision – Contracts and Grants webform should be processed by the department. This will rebudget the funds into the correct budget ps accounts. If the budget revision is to be done between sponsored projects on the same award, the process will be managed by the Research Office.

Equipment

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Equipment

The Facilities and Administrative Cost-Rates Agreement defines “equipment” as an article of non-expendable tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per unit. Please direct any questions relating to this policy to your Contract and Grant Administrator.

Equipment Cost-Share Policy

Facilities & Administrative (F&A)

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Facilities and Administrative Costs FY19 Provisional Rates

The University of Delaware Facilities and Administrative (F&A) rates below are for use on grants, contracts and/or other agreements issued or awarded to the UD. These provisional rates are effective July 1, 2018 – June 30, 2019.

 

ActivityLocationFederal RateState RateIndustry Rate
Organized ResearchOn Campus56.0%
41.0% (Agriculture)
38.0%56%
Off Campus28.0%28.0%28.0%
Other Sponsored Activities (Public Service)On Campus38.4%32.0%38.4%
Off Campus26.3%26.3%26.3%
Sponsored Instruction (Training)On Campus48.6%32.0%48.6%
Off Campus33.0%33.0%33.0%

ABOVE RATES: These rates are applied to the Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC) base.

 

F&A Waivers and

Institutional Letters of Support

Procedure for Requesting Letters of Support and Cost Share Commitments from the Research Office

Principal investigators (PIs) are encouraged to review UD’s Cost Sharing Policy. Cost share letters and or commitments require sufficient preparation and often a long lead time. PIs should start this conversation with their respective department chairs, or college research office/deans as early as possible. All proposals that require cost share commitments and/or letters of support from UD leadership (President, Provost, VP Research) should follow the steps outlined herein. Please route all the requests for cost shares and letters of support requiring UD leadership support through the Associate Vice President for Research Development. Encourage the PI’s and Research Deans to engage with the Research Office (RO) as early as possible through the Research Development Office. Use email researchdev@udel.edu for communication to the Research Office. The timeline depends on the complexity of the cost shares/commitments and level of letters of support and is specified below:

Please route all the requests for cost shares and letters of support requiring UD leadership support through the Associate Vice President for Research Development. Encourage the PI’s and Research Deans to engage with the Research Office (RO) as early as possible through the Research Development Office. Use email researchdev@udel.edu for communication to the Research Office.

The timeline depends on the complexity of the cost shares/commitments and level of letters of support and is specified below:

Cost Sharing and F&A Modifications:
  1. Standard equipment match requests should follow the Equipment Cost Share policy and be communicated to the RO at least 1 week in advance of the submission date.
  2. RO should be notified at least 2 weeks from the submission date for proposals with substantial match such as non‐equipment match. Large/complex proposals, such as Major Research.
  3. Instrumentation grants, or proposals involving more than one college, generally require very substantial university cost share commitments and therefore need even more lead time.
  4. Unless F&A is limited by the sponsor, any reductions of F&A, including its use as cost share need to be communicated to the RO at least 2 weeks in advance.
Letters of Support (LOS):
  1. Letters of support that involve language for cost shares need to follow Cost Share schedule noted above. See also #3 below.
  2. At least 5 business days before proposal submission date for letters of support that need President or Provost signature. 3 business days for letters of support that need VP for Research support.
  3. The PI and/or respective Research Dean must provide a draft summary for such letters and key points that must be emphasized in the LOS paying careful attention to the solicitation’s guidelines.
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Fixed Fringe Benefit Rates

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Fixed Fringe Benefit Rates

 

Personnel CatagoryFY 19 RateFor Agriculture 3A funding (only)
Faculty/Professional Employees40.8%31.5%
Staff Employees65.2%48.0%
Graduate Students5.9% 5.9%
Other*7.0% 7.0%

 

*excludes student wages exempt from FICA

The full Fringe Benefits Rate Agreement can be found here.

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Modified Total Direct Cost

Salary Reference Sheet

Graduate Tuition Rates

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Off-Campus Definition

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Modified Total Direct Cost

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Modified Total Direct Costs (MTDC)

Modified Total Direct Cost (MTDC) consists of: salaries and wages, fringe benefits, materials and supplies, services, travel, the first $25,000 of each subaward, Equipment (defined as an article of nonexpendable tangible personal property having a useful life of more than one year and an acquisition cost of $5,000 or more per item), capital expenditures, patient care costs, rental costs, tuition, scholarships and fellowships, participant support costs and vessel (ship) costs.

The following expenditures are excluded from the MTDC Base.

Obj Code Description
122700 Graduate Fellow – Non-Taxable
126300 Stipends
146100 Participant Support Non Employee
146115 Participant Support Student
146190 Participant Support Vendor
146800 CEOE Ship Charges
148800 Audit Fee
149000 Tuition
149300 Financial Aid
153100 Equipment Fabrication
153300 Subcontract Payments > $25,000
154200 Rental Cost of Offsite Facilities
155200 RVSHARP Ship Charges
16xx Equipment > $5,000
19xxx Overhead & Credits

Salary Reference Sheet

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Salary Reference Sheet

NOTE: These rates are negotiated annually.

Download Salary Reference Sheet
MS Excel  excel document    PDF   pdf document 

Graduate Tuition Rates

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Tuition Rates

Graduate Students Tuition Rate

Current University of Delaware graduate per credit base and adjusted rates for specific programs can be found on the Graduate and Professional Education Office’s website. UD Deans have made adjustments to the base tuition rate in specific programs that reduce the per credit cost.


Grad Tuition Policy

Effective with proposals submitted on or after February 1, 2016:

  • Graduate tuition will be direct charged to all grants and contracts at a rate of 20% of the total graduate tuition
  • Exceptions to this Policy may be granted by the PI’s dean when the total funding available to the PI(s) for the project is less than $75,000 per year or in cases wherein the funding organization has a written policy precluding charging of graduate tuition to awards, and should be documented in the proposal approval routing form
  • In all cases, graduate tuition revenue collected via grants and contracts will be allocated to support research and/or graduate programs only
  • Please see Frequently Asked Questions on Graduate Tuition Policy
  • Questions about Graduate Tuition Policy? Please contact your Contract and Grants Administrator

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Off-Campus Definition

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Off-Campus Definition

For all activities performed in facilities not owned by the institution, the off campus rate will apply. (For all activities performed in facilities rented with institution funds, the on campus rate will apply). Grants or contracts will not be subject to more than one indirect cost rate. If more than 50% of a project is performed off campus, the off campus rate will apply to the entire project.

 

SUBAWARD PROPOSAL INFORMATION

Subaward Proposal Info

Subaward Monitoring

Federal Demo Project (FDP)

Subawards Proposal Forms

Subaward Proposal Info

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Subaward Proposal Information

Subawards are awards provided by a pass-through entity to a subrecipient for the subrecipient to carry out part of a Federal award received by the pass-through entity. It does not include payments to a contractor or payments to an individual that is a beneficiary of a Federal program. A subaward may be provided through any form of legal agreement, including an agreement that the pass-through entity considers a contract.

When UD’s Proposal Includes a Subaward for an Investigator at Another Institution

ITEMS REQUIRED FROM SUBRECIPIENTS FOR A UD PROPOSAL:
  1. Look up the institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database located at: https://fdpclearinghouse.org/organizations
  2. Obtain the items listed in the applicable table below, depending on whether or not the subrecipient institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse (see below for explanation).

     

    Necessary Documents for Subaward Contracts
    Table A Table B
    MEMBER OF FDP Expanded Clearinghouse* NOT A MEMBER of FDP Expanded Clearinghouse*
  3. Include the above items as Attachments to the proposal in the UD Financials Grants System

When UD is a Subrecipient in a Proposal Being Submitted by Another Institution

  1. Look up the other institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database located at: https://fdpclearinghouse.org/organizations
  2. If the institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse:
    1. Attach a completed UD FDP Letter of Intent to the Attachments Tab of the UD proposal when routed for internal approvals, to be signed by the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator.
    2. Do not complete a Subrecipient Information form for the other institution. If they request that you do, politely remind them that UD is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse (other institution can obtain UD’s data from the Clearinghouse).
  3. If the institution is not a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse:
    1. Attach a completed UD non-FDP Subaward Cover Letter to the Attachments Tab of the UD proposal when routed for internal approvals, to be signed by the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator.
    2. The other institution may request that we complete their Subrecipient Information form.

Federal Demonstration Project (FDP) Expanded Clearinghouse Participation

UD is a member of the FDP, a non-profit organization comprised of Universities and other research institutions along with representatives of several research-oriented Federal Agencies. Among other activities, the FDP develops tools for its members to streamline the administration of research. One of those tools is the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, a nation-wide database containing institutional profiles and data of 200+ member institutions. The member institutions agree to obtain the institutional data needed to prepare subrecipient agreements from this database rather than requiring each other to prepare administrative informational forms for every proposal they jointly submit. This saves a great deal of administrative work for all of the participating institutions and provides them with an easily accessible, up-to-date source of this data.

 

  1. Who determines if the other institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      The Department Administrator or PI looks up the other institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database when preparing the proposal.
  2. Where do I get a user ID and password for the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      You do not need a user ID or password to be able to access the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse data.
  3. How do I let the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator know that the subaward institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      Attach the other institution’s FDP-style Letter of Intent to the UD Financials Grant proposal.
  4. Do I need to send UD’s Letter of Intent template (LOI) to the other institution for them to complete?
      Maybe. Member institutions are likely to have their own institution’s LOI to use for proposals with other member institutions. However, you can send them UD’s LOI to use as a sample if they ask for one.
  5. Does the other institution’s Letter of Intent (LOI) need to follow the same format as UD’s FDP LOI?
      No, but, it should provide essentially the same project-specific information, it should not request completion of data that can be obtained from the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, and it should be signed by the Authorized Official for the subrecipient institution.
  6. What do I do if another FDP Expanded Clearinghouse member institution asks me to complete their Subrecipient Commitment Form?
      Politely inform them that UD is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse and that you will provide them with a signed FDP Letter of Intent instead.
  7. When UD is a subrecipient under an institution that is not a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, can I send them a UD FDP Letter of Intent?
      Yes.
  8. Who uses the Letter of Intent (LOI)?
      The LOI is intended for internal use to represent institutional endorsement of the proposed subaward budget and scope of work by the Subrecipient’s Authorized Official. It is not designed to meet any specific sponsor’s proposal requirements, although it may be used in the proposal submitted to the sponsor if desired. The wording of the LOI may be altered slightly to add sponsor-specific requirements if it is acceptable to both institutions.

Subaward Monitoring

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Subaward Monitoring: The Role of the Department Administrator

“Subaward monitoring” is a popular buzz phrase in the research administration world. But many of us hear that and think, Am I supposed to be doing something about that? And, what does that mean, anyway? The truth is, the Department Administrator plays a key role in carrying out effective subaward monitoring. Below you will find resources from the session covering this topic at the 2018 Research Administration Conference.

Federal Demo Project (FDP)

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Federal Demonstration Project (FDP) Expanded Clearinghouse Participation

UD is a member of the FDP, a non-profit organization comprised of Universities and other research institutions along with representatives of several research-oriented Federal Agencies. Among other activities, the FDP develops tools for its members to streamline the administration of research. One of those tools is the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, a nation-wide database containing institutional profiles and data of 200+ member institutions. The member institutions agree to obtain the institutional data needed to prepare subrecipient agreements from this database rather than requiring each other to prepare administrative informational forms for every proposal they jointly submit. This saves a great deal of administrative work for all of the participating institutions and provides them with an easily accessible, up-to-date source of this data.

  1. Who determines if the other institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      The Department Administrator or PI looks up the other institution in the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse database when preparing the proposal.
  2. Where do I get a user ID and password for the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      You do not need a user ID or password to be able to access the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse data.
  3. How do I let the Research Office Contract and Grant Administrator know that the subaward institution is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse?
      Attach the other institution’s FDP-style Letter of Intent to the UD Financials Grant proposal.
  4. Do I need to send UD’s Letter of Intent template (LOI) to the other institution for them to complete?
      Maybe. Member institutions are likely to have their own institution’s LOI to use for proposals with other member institutions. However, you can send them UD’s LOI to use as a sample if they ask for one.
  5. Does the other institution’s Letter of Intent (LOI) need to follow the same format as UD’s FDP LOI?
      No, but, it should provide essentially the same project-specific information, it should not request completion of data that can be obtained from the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, and it should be signed by the Authorized Official for the subrecipient institution.
  6. What do I do if another FDP Expanded Clearinghouse member institution asks me to complete their Subrecipient Commitment Form?
      Politely inform them that UD is a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse and that you will provide them with a signed FDP Letter of Intent instead.
  7. When UD is a subrecipient under an institution that is not a member of the FDP Expanded Clearinghouse, can I send them a UD FDP Letter of Intent?
      Yes.
  8. Who uses the Letter of Intent (LOI)?
      The LOI is intended for internal use to represent institutional endorsement of the proposed subaward budget and scope of work by the Subrecipient’s Authorized Official. It is not designed to meet any specific sponsor’s proposal requirements, although it may be used in the proposal submitted to the sponsor if desired. The wording of the LOI may be altered slightly to add sponsor-specific requirements if it is acceptable to both institutions.

Subawards Proposal Forms

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Subaward Proposal Forms

Below you will find a list of the various forms referenced in the Proposal Checklist for proposals involving subawards. Please refer to the table in “Subaward Information” to see which forms are appropriate for UD being the recipient or distributer of the subaward

 

 

PROPOSAL REFERENCES

Gifts and Sponsored Agreement

Data Management Plans

Institutional Letters of Support

UD Financials: PeopleSoft

Gifts and Sponsored Agreement

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Gifts and Sponsored Agreements

There often exists a question over whether funds from a foundation or other (non-federal) organization are to be treated as gifts or sponsored awards. The two are very much intertwined. Awards may be received as either a gift or in the form of a sponsored agreement. In certain situations, a gift may be administered out of the Office of Sponsored Programs Administration, located in the UD Research Office, or jointly with the Development office; these determinations are made at the time of the solicitation/proposal.

For additional information download the documentation on Research-Related Gifts and Sponsored Agreements.

Data Management Plans

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Data Management Plans

Many federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and most recently the National Science Foundation (NSF), are requiring that grant applications contain data management plans for projects involving data collection. Beginning January 18, 2011, proposals submitted to NSF must include a supplementary document of no more than two pages labeled “Data Management Plan” (DMP). This supplementary document should describe how the proposal will conform to NSF policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results. According to the NSF Grant Proposal Guide, the DMP will now be reviewed as an integral part of the proposal. Proposals that do not include a DMP will not be able to be submitted.

 

Elements of a Good Data Management Plan include:

  • Data description: Brief, high-level description of the information to be gathered; the nature, scope and scale of the data that will be generated or collected.
  • Content and Format: Formats in which the data will be generated, maintained, and made available, including a justification for the procedural and archival appropriateness of those formats.
  • Access and sharing: Indicate how you intend to archive and share your data and why you have chosen that particular option. This should include a description and rationale for any restrictions on who may access the data under what conditions and a timeline for providing access. This should also include a description of the resources and capabilities (equipment, connections, systems, expertise, repositories, etc.) needed to meet anticipated requests. These resources and capabilities should be appropriate for the projected usage, addressing any special requirements such as those associate with streaming video or audio, movement of massive data sets, etc.

    Statement of plans for metadata content and format, including description of documentation plans and rationale for selection of appropriate standards. Existing, accepted standards should be used where possible. Where standards are missing or inadequate, alternate strategies for enabling data re-use and re-purposing should be described.

  • Intellectual Property Rights Protection: Statement of plans, where appropriate and necessary, for protection of privacy, confidentiality, security, intellectual property and other rights.
  • Security: A description of technical and procedural protections for information, including confidential information, and how permissions, restrictions, and embargoes will be enforced.
  • Selection and Retention Periods: A description of how data will be selected for arching, how long the data will be held, and plans for eventual or termination of the data collection in the future.
  • Archiving and Preservation: Description of plans for preserving data in accessible form. Plans should include a timeline proposing how long the data are to preserved, outlining any changes in access anticipated during the preservation timeline, and documenting the resources and capabilities (e.g., equipment, connections, systems, expertise) needed to meet the preservation goals. Where data will be preserved beyond the duration of direct project funding, a description of other funding sources of institutional commitments necessary to achieve the long-term preservation and access goals should be provided.
  • Storage and Backup: Storage methods and backup procedures for the data, including the physical and cyber resources and facilities that will be used for the effective preservation and storage of the research data.
  • Responsibility: Names of the individuals responsible for data management in the research project.*This particularly important when working with multiple PIs and/or collaborative partners.
  • Budget: The costs of preparing data and documentation for archiving and how these costs will be paid. Requests for funding may be included, depending on the agency (i.e., NSF guidance)

Institutional Letters of Support

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Institutional Letters of Support

Procedure for Requesting Letters of Support and Cost Share Commitments from the Research Office

Principal investigators (PIs) are encouraged to review UD’s Cost Sharing Policy. Cost share letters and or commitments require sufficient preparation and often a long lead time. PIs should start this conversation with their respective department chairs, or college research office/deans as early as possible. All proposals that require cost share commitments and/or letters of support from UD leadership (President, Provost, VP Research) should follow the steps outlined herein. Please route all the requests for cost shares and letters of support requiring UD leadership support through the Associate Vice President for Research Development. Encourage the PI’s and Research Deans to engage with the Research Office (RO) as early as possible through the Research Development Office. Use email researchdev@udel.edu for communication to the Research Office. The timeline depends on the complexity of the cost shares/commitments and level of letters of support and is specified below:

Please route all the requests for cost shares and letters of support requiring UD leadership support through the Associate Vice President for Research Development. Encourage the PI’s and Research Deans to engage with the Research Office (RO) as early as possible through the Research Development Office. Use email researchdev@udel.edu for communication to the Research Office.

The timeline depends on the complexity of the cost shares/commitments and level of letters of support and is specified below:

Cost Sharing and F&A Modifications:
  1. Standard equipment match requests should follow the Equipment Cost Share policy and be communicated to the RO at least 1 week in advance of the submission date.
  2. RO should be notified at least 2 weeks from the submission date for proposals with substantial match such as non‐equipment match. Large/complex proposals, such as Major Research.
  3. Instrumentation grants, or proposals involving more than one college, generally require very substantial university cost share commitments and therefore need even more lead time.
  4. Unless F&A is limited by the sponsor, any reductions of F&A, including its use as cost share need to be communicated to the RO at least 2 weeks in advance.
Letters of Support (LOS):
  1. Letters of support that involve language for cost shares need to follow Cost Share schedule noted above. See also #3 below.
  2. At least 5 business days before proposal submission date for letters of support that need President or Provost signature. 3 business days for letters of support that need VP for Research support.
  3. The PI and/or respective Research Dean must provide a draft summary for such letters and key points that must be emphasized in the LOS paying careful attention to the solicitation’s guidelines.
PDF Download

UD Financials: PeopleSoft

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Getting Started

Am I eligible to serve as a principal investigator (PI) on a research proposal?

Principal Investigators Eligibility

Principal Investigators and Co-Principal Investigators have primary institutional responsibility for providing scientific/technical leadership and administrative and financial management of sponsored projects. As such, the University has designated the following personnel as eligible to serve as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on sponsored projects*

 

  • All full-time faculty regardless of academic rank
  • Visiting faculty/visiting scientists during the time they draw salary support for the performance of the sponsored project through the University
  • Adjunct faculty during the time they draw salary support for the performance of the sponsored project through the University
  • Full-time, academic non-administrative professionals in classified positions at or above Level 31E
  • All full-time postdoctoral fellows* and researchers
  • Under exceptional circumstances documented in writing, other qualified individuals may be designated as a PI. Such designation requires the approval of the Vice President for Research, Scholarship and Innovation, and must be endorsed by the chair of every unit and the dean of every college in which the research project is to be performed. If granted, this PI designation is limited to the proposed research project under consideration, i.e. it does not afford blanket status to serve as a PI on other proposals. To qualify for an exception, the following criteria must be met:
    • Only individuals identified to the external sponsor as a PI or CPI in the submitted proposal need to have the PI eligibility approval form completed
    • The proposed research must be a programmatic priority of the University
    • There must demonstrably be no qualified member of the UD faculty who is capable of serving or available to serve as the PI
    • The proposed PI must possess the academic and experiential qualifications that are prerequisite to service as a PI at UD, and his or her participation as the PI must be demonstrably necessary for the successful funding and execution of the research project
    • The proposal PI must enter into a signed contract with the University assuring that (a) the work will be conducted in accordance with the high standards of quality expected of all PIs; (b) the PI will comply with all University policies relating to the conduct of research; and (c) the research project will be conducted consistent with all federal laws, rules, and regulations relating to the conduct of research
    • Completion of the Research Office PI approval form and submission of a curriculum vitae (CV)

Process for submission of PI Eligibility Form:
  • Form should be completed and all signatures obtained
  • CV must be included with form
  • Email the completed form and CV to your Contract & Grant Specialist who will obtain the required Research Office approval signature
  • Contract & Grant Specialist will return executed form to department administrator

* Principal Investigator/Co-Principal Investigator status may be rescinded for cause.
*A PI approval form is required to permit postdoctoral fellows to serve this role


If an exception is made to make someone an eligible PI and that person isn't a full-time University employee, the chair or dean must be a co-PI on all proposals for that person.

Retired Faculty Serving as Principal Investigators

Some faculty members wish to continue their research programs after retirement from the University, but do not qualify for status as principal investigators because they are no longer full-time UD employees. Retired faculty members may apply for PI status using the existing Research Office PI approval form.

If the request is approved, retired faculty members may serve initially as co-PIs on proposals with a full-time faculty member as PI (this would typically be the department chair or another senior faculty member). If the proposal is funded and the retired faculty member is hired to work on that grant, he or she may then serve as the PI during the life of the grant. At the time of hiring, the retired faculty member may be appointed to an appropriate professional staff position (such as, for example, senior research fellow), but under no conditions may be re-hired on the faculty (as, for example, a research professor).

Graduate Students as Principal Investigators

The Research Office acknowledges the importance of permitting graduate students to lead sponsored projects where appropriate. There are several sponsors who offer pre-doctoral grants whereby the work is conceived of and carried out entirely by a graduate student. In these cases, a faculty member is identified as a mentor and oversees the project nominally. (examples: NASA: Harriett G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship Program (JPFP), NIH: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellowships (F31) to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research, NIH: Predoctoral Training at the Interface of the Behavioral and Biomedical Sciences, DOE: The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program).

To that end, the eligible PI approval form may be used at the time of proposal routing to permit the graduate student to have this role. Also, please have the department administrators ensure the graduate student’s supervisor code is associated with a chair and dean code. This will allow the proposal approval web form to be routed appropriately. The required completed form must be sent to the Research Office at least ten (10) working days before the deadline for submittal of the proposal to the funding agency.

There are still other sponsors for whom the need for submission and approval from an Authorized Representative of the University is not required. The student may submit these applications directly to the sponsor without coordination with the Research Office or a PI eligibility form (examples include: NSF Fellowship, Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships for Achieving Excellence in College and University Teaching).

If there are questions concerning which type of funding the grad student is applying, contact the Research Office for guidance.

Responsibilities of a Principal Investigator

Serving as a Principal Investigator (PI) at the University of Delaware brings significant rewards and confers concomitant responsibilities. PIs are responsible for the intellectual direction of research and scholarship and for the education and training of students. In carrying out these critical tasks, PIs are also responsible for compliance with laws and regulations that touch on all aspects of the research enterprise.

To ensure compliance with applicable rules, regulations, and contract requirements the University of Delaware requires all PIs to receive training in the financial management of sponsored projects. Developed for PIs already at the University, the University's training program focuses on stewardship of funds, mandatory reporting requirements and particularized training in the fundamentals of federal grant and contract accounting. PIs must complete mandatory training before the University will release project funding.

 

What is a conflict of interest and do I have a conflict?

As defined in the University of Delaware's Policies and Procedures Manual, "a conflict of interest occurs when there is a divergence between an individual's private interests and his or her professional obligations such that an independent observer might reasonably question whether the individual's professional actions or decisions are influenced by considerations of personal gain, financial or otherwise. A conflict of interest depends on the situation, and not on the character or actions of the individual.” For further information on conflict of interest click here.

Where can I find Funding Opportunities?

An excellent way to identify potential sponsors is to network with faculty, industry representatives, and government agency personnel. Funding opportunities for sponsored research are available to UD-eligible principal investigators from a variety of federal and state agencies and private foundations. Information on limited submission opportunities, General University Research (GUR) grants and UD Research Foundation (UDRF) grants are also available on the Funding Opportunities page.

Another excellent tool for identifying potential funding opportunities is the Community of Science database, which is available to UD employees through a paid subscription from UD's Morris Library. Library staff periodically offers workshops on effective use of the database.

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What should a researcher do before submitting for funding? Or I've found a funding opportunity that is the right match for my research. What are my next steps?

Familiarize yourself with UD's Responsible Conduct of Research. Compliance with UD's code of conduct, policies, and procedures is critical. If human subject or animal subjects or will be using hazards materials, for example, would be used in your research project, you must abide by specific policies and complete specific forms and reviews as part of the proposal application. You'll find links to all of UD's policies and procedures and required forms here. Allow enough time to develop the proposal and meet the agency's funding deadline. Competitive applications often reflect the input of multiple colleagues, and large, multidisciplinary and multi-institutional projects require a great deal of advance planning even before writing the proposal can begin. Keep in mind that the Research Office needs a minimum of 72 hoursthree business days prior to the agency deadline — to process your proposal or it will not be submitted to the sponsor. Submit keywords through the Employee Demographic Data (EDD) form prior to submitting a proposal. The Proposal Key Word are used to track proposals by subject category (for example: disease, avian, solar) and to link multiple science codes to projects. These identifiers are important for reporting both internally and externally by science categories. Please see your department administrator for assistance with the EDD. Know if "cost-sharing" is required by the funding agency. "Cost-sharing" refers to the University's commitment of funds, equipment, or services toward the project, beyond the funding that would be provided by the agency. Typical examples include equipment, personnel effort, and tuition. If cost-sharing is required, you need to find out if your dean would approve this cost before proceeding. Notify your departmental research administrator of your proposal plans. This individual works in partnership with a Contract and Grant Administrator in the UD Research Office. You can locate your department's research administrator on our Staff Directory Web page. This individual can help you learn the ropes by assisting you in the completion of required forms and in answering questions about cost rates and other details related to the development of your budget. If your proposal is for a federal grant and will need to be submitted via Grants.gov, this individual can help answer your registration questions. Find a faculty mentor. A junior faculty is encouraged to seek a faculty mentor. Some departments assign a mentor to a new faculty member. A senior faculty can guide a proposal process, from writing to submission.

How do I develop a competitive proposal?

You need to have good, innovative ideas, an understanding of the funding agency's mission and goals, and pay careful attention to the theme and requirements specified in the funding announcement. A good proposal should be compelling, understandable, well-organized, grammatically correct, exhibit correct spelling, and it must meet the due date, formatting, and length requirements specified in the agency's guidelines.

If you've carefully read the agency's funding announcement and have specific questions about a proposal idea, consult the program officer at the funding agency for advice or clarification.

Most proposals contain common elements, such as the following:

  1. A project summary that should clearly articulate the significance and innovation of the research and its expected outcomes
  2. A project description that details the goals of the project and how you will accomplish them, often including how you will evaluate the project and disseminate the research to various public audiences to meet "broader impacts" requirements
  3. References cited
  4. A budget that is in line with the award range of the funding program along with a detailed budget justification that has been developed in compliance with UD's current rates (see the "Proposal Tools and Data" sidebar on this Web page); Biographical sketches of the project team, and
  5. Letters of commitment/support from appropriate administrators and partnering institutions

Please note:

To request a letter of support from the UD Research Office, the Provost, or President, please follow this procedure:

  1. Draft the letter of support
  2. E-mail the letter to your Contract and Grant Administrator in the Research Office. To locate the correct staff member, see the Department Administrator directory in the Staff Directory

If changes to the letter are required, you will be notified.The Research Office will shepherd the letter and proposal to the appropriate UD administrator for signature and provide a copy to you for your files.

If your proposal requires an evaluation component, an excellent resource to consult on campus is the UD Education Research and Development Center. If your proposal requires "Broader Impacts" in informal public education and outreach, contact the Research Communications Initiative in the UD Office of Public Relations for advice. The office participates in selected proposals and also is aware of other units on campus who are involved in public education and outreach that may be available to assist you.

As you draft your proposal, make sure to cross-reference your content with key themes and requirements indicated in the funding announcement. Ask colleagues with experience writing winning proposals to read your draft and provide constructive criticism. You might also ask to serve on an upcoming proposal review panel for a particular agency to gain further insight into how proposals are evaluated.

Developing competitive research proposals is hard work, but the rewards can be great in terms of future discoveries. It's important not to be discouraged if your proposal is not funded, but to learn from the experience and prepare for the next opportunity.

The solicitation requires that my proposal be submitted electronically. How do I obtain access to various electronic submission site (example: Fastlane, ERA Commons, NSPIRE, etc)?

FASTLANE

If you are intending to submit a proposal to NSF you will need access to Fastlane. Please send an email request to your Contract and Grant Administrator with the PI's name, birth date, type of degree and the year it was received so the new PI can be added to FASTLANE. Please note Fastlane will provide the PI with a NSF login number that will become part of their personal logon process.

NIH eRA COMMONS

If you intend to submit a proposal to NIH, please send an email request to your Contract and Grant Administrator (CGA) (https://www.udel.edu/research/about/directory.html ) to create ”User Name”. You will need to provide the following information:

PI's name, birth date, any previous NIH user names and if the PI has had any previous NIH grants, we will need the grant number. Please note the Research Office will establish the User Name but eRA Commons will provide the PI with a password.

NASA NSPIRE

If you intend to submit a NASA proposal you will need to register with NSPIRE. This registration will create a request at the Research Office to allow the new user to be affiliated with the University of Delaware.

GRANTS.GOV

The University of Delaware is registered in Grants.gov. Individuals cannot register to submit proposals on behalf of the University. Only your Contract and Grant Administrators in the Research Office can submit proposals as the Authorized Organization Representative (AOR) for the University of Delaware.

How do I route a proposal approval form for signatures?

Any time a new proposal is submitted to a sponsor, or an increase in the funding or University resources occurs (in the case of a re-budget or renewal) a Proposal Approval Form must be routed. In the case of a renewal where the resources are less than expected, or there is NO change, a form NEED NOT be routed.

A proposal record must be created in UD Peoplesoft Grants system to originate the form. Work with your department administrator to create the record and submit the proposal for routing.

I found a solicitation that limits the number of proposals that can be submitted. What is the UD Research Office proceedures on Limited Submission Proposals?

Many federal agencies and foundations offer grants, awards, and fellowships that limit the number of applications that can come from one institution. In order to increase the chances of UD succeeding in such "limited submission opportunity" applications, UD Research Office has established procedures for reviewing pre-proposals for such competitions in a timely fashion.

Do pre-proposals require UD Research Office approval?

Any time the University is obligating resources or requesting funds, the UD Research Office must be included in the submission. A Pre-proposal to a sponsor must go through the UD Research Office routing for approval and official submission through institutional signatures.

I am preparing a letter of intent, does it have to be signed by the Research Office?

Letters of Intent (LOI) that do not address funding amount or UD commitments (ie; time commitments/match etc.) do not require signature of the Research Office (unless required by sponsor). However, the Research Office should be copied on the LOI. Typically, the purpose of this type of intent is for sponsor to determine the amount of man hours required for review process. Keep in mind that it is helpful to notify your Contract and Grant Administrator when you become aware of any proposal submissions so they can better serve the needs of the faculty.

Who at University of Delaware signs as the authorized representative for proposal applications?

Authorized RepresentativeProposed First Year Total
Contract and Grant SpecialistUp to $250,000
Assistant Director, Pre AwardUp to $500,000
Assistant Vice President, Research AdministrationUp to $1,000,000
Cordell M. Overby, Associate Vice President, Research & Regulatory AffairsUp to $1,000,000
Domenico Grasso, University ProvostOver $1,000,000
Dennis Assanis, PresidentOver $2,000,000

What basic information should be on the SF424 for a Grants.gov proposal submission?

Sample Application for Federal Assistance SF 424 (RandR) Form

The Standard Proposal Information will provide you important key elements related to the University. (example: DUNS number, Tax Identification Number/TIN, CAGE code, etc.).

What are the important points I should know when preparing an NIH Grants.gov application?

Where do I find more information about NIH Grants.gov application procedures?

Where can I find the NSF Grants.gov application guidelines?

Please access the NSF Grants.gov application guide here: NSF Grants.gov Application Guide

Where do I find information regarding sponsor guidelines?

Please review the Grants Management Guide for further information.

How do I construct a budget?

The attached spreadsheet is a guide to assist you in building a budget for your proposal. Download Excel file.

Proposal Preparation

Am I eligible to serve as a principal investigator (PI) on a research proposal?

Principal Investigators Eligibility

Principal Investigators and Co-Principal Investigators have primary institutional responsibility for providing scientific/technical leadership and administrative and financial management of sponsored projects. As such, the University has designated the following personnel as eligible to serve as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator on sponsored projects*

 

  • All full-time faculty regardless of academic rank
  • Visiting faculty/visiting scientists during the time they draw salary support for the performance of the sponsored project through the University
  • Adjunct faculty during the time they draw salary support for the performance of the sponsored project through the University
  • Full-time, academic non-administrative professionals in classified positions at or above Level 31E
  • All full-time postdoctoral fellows* and researchers
  • Under exceptional circumstances documented in writing, other qualified individuals may be designated as a PI. Such designation requires the approval of the Vice President for Research, Scholarship and Innovation, and must be endorsed by the chair of every unit and the dean of every college in which the research project is to be performed. If granted, this PI designation is limited to the proposed research project under consideration, i.e. it does not afford blanket status to serve as a PI on other proposals. To qualify for an exception, the following criteria must be met:
    • Only individuals identified to the external sponsor as a PI or CPI in the submitted proposal need to have the PI eligibility approval form completed
    • The proposed research must be a programmatic priority of the University
    • There must demonstrably be no qualified member of the UD faculty who is capable of serving or available to serve as the PI
    • The proposed PI must possess the academic and experiential qualifications that are prerequisite to service as a PI at UD, and his or her participation as the PI must be demonstrably necessary for the successful funding and execution of the research project
    • The proposal PI must enter into a signed contract with the University assuring that (a) the work will be conducted in accordance with the high standards of quality expected of all PIs; (b) the PI will comply with all University policies relating to the conduct of research; and (c) the research project will be conducted consistent with all federal laws, rules, and regulations relating to the conduct of research
    • Completion of the Research Office PI approval form and submission of a curriculum vitae (CV)

Process for submission of PI Eligibility Form:
  • Form should be completed and all signatures obtained
  • CV must be included with form
  • Email the completed form and CV to your Contract & Grant Specialist who will obtain the required Research Office approval signature
  • Contract & Grant Specialist will return executed form to department administrator

* Principal Investigator/Co-Principal Investigator status may be rescinded for cause.
*A PI approval form is required to permit postdoctoral fellows to serve this role


If an exception is made to make someone an eligible PI and that person isn't a full-time University employee, the chair or dean must be a co-PI on all proposals for that person.

Retired Faculty Serving as Principal Investigators

Some faculty members wish to continue their research programs after retirement from the University, but do not qualify for status as principal investigators because they are no longer full-time UD employees. Retired faculty members may apply for PI status using the existing Research Office PI approval form.

If the request is approved, retired faculty members may serve initially as co-PIs on proposals with a full-time faculty member as PI (this would typically be the department chair or another senior faculty member). If the proposal is funded and the retired faculty member is hired to work on that grant, he or she may then serve as the PI during the life of the grant. At the time of hiring, the retired faculty member may be appointed to an appropriate professional staff position (such as, for example, senior research fellow), but under no conditions may be re-hired on the faculty (as, for example, a research professor).

Graduate Students as Principal Investigators

The Research Office acknowledges the importance of permitting graduate students to lead sponsored projects where appropriate. There are several sponsors who offer pre-doctoral grants whereby the work is conceived of and carried out entirely by a graduate student. In these cases, a faculty member is identified as a mentor and oversees the project nominally. (examples: NASA: Harriett G. Jenkins Predoctoral Fellowship Program (JPFP), NIH: Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Awards for Individual Predoctoral Fellowships (F31) to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research, NIH: Predoctoral Training at the Interface of the Behavioral and Biomedical Sciences, DOE: The National Methane Hydrates R&D Program - Graduate Fellowship Program).

To that end, the eligible PI approval form may be used at the time of proposal routing to permit the graduate student to have this role. Also, please have the department administrators ensure the graduate student’s supervisor code is associated with a chair and dean code. This will allow the proposal approval web form to be routed appropriately. The required completed form must be sent to the Research Office at least ten (10) working days before the deadline for submittal of the proposal to the funding agency.

There are still other sponsors for whom the need for submission and approval from an Authorized Representative of the University is not required. The student may submit these applications directly to the sponsor without coordination with the Research Office or a PI eligibility form (examples include: NSF Fellowship, Ford Foundation Diversity Fellowships for Achieving Excellence in College and University Teaching).

If there are questions concerning which type of funding the grad student is applying, contact the Research Office for guidance.

Responsibilities of a Principal Investigator

Serving as a Principal Investigator (PI) at the University of Delaware brings significant rewards and confers concomitant responsibilities. PIs are responsible for the intellectual direction of research and scholarship and for the education and training of students. In carrying out these critical tasks, PIs are also responsible for compliance with laws and regulations that touch on all aspects of the research enterprise.

To ensure compliance with applicable rules, regulations, and contract requirements the University of Delaware requires all PIs to receive training in the financial management of sponsored projects. Developed for PIs already at the University, the University's training program focuses on stewardship of funds, mandatory reporting requirements and particularized training in the fundamentals of federal grant and contract accounting. PIs must complete mandatory training before the University will release project funding.

 

Where can I find research funding?

A good starting point is our Funding Opportunities page. It includes information on the Community of Science database, which is accessible by UD employees, in addition to links to the Web sites of key federal agencies that support research. Information on limited submission opportunities, General University Research grants, and UD Research Foundation grants also is available here.

I've found a research opportunity that is right up my alley. What are the next steps?

First, familiarize yourself with UD's Responsible Conduct of Research. Compliance with UD's code of conduct, policies, and procedures is critical. If human or animal subjects, for example, would be used in your research project, you must abide by specific policies and complete specific forms and reviews as part of the proposal application. You'll find links to all of UD's policies and procedures and required forms here.

From a practical standpoint, you need to make sure you have enough time to develop your proposal and meet the agency's funding deadline. Competitive applications often reflect the input of multiple colleagues, and large, multidisciplinary and multi-institutional projects require a great deal of advance planning even before writing the proposal can begin. Keep in mind that the Research Office needs a minimum of 72 hours — three business days prior to the agency deadline — to process your proposal, or it will not be submitted to the sponsor. More background on the policy is available here.

From a fiscal standpoint, you need to know if "cost-sharing" is required by the funding agency. "Cost-sharing" refers to the University's commitment of funds, equipment, or services toward the project, beyond the funding that would be provided by the agency. Typical examples include equipment, personnel effort, and tuition. If cost-sharing is required, you need to find out if your dean would approve this cost before proceeding.

With the appropriate administrative approval, the next thing to do is to notify your departmental research administrator of your proposal plans. This individual works in partnership with a contract-and-grant representative in the Research Office. You can locate your department's research administrator on our Staff Directory Web page. This individual can help you learn the ropes by assisting you in the completion of required forms and in answering questions about cost rates and other details related to the development of your budget. If your proposal is for a federal grant and will need to be submitted via Grants.gov, this individual can help answer your registration questions.

How do I develop a competitive proposal?

You need to have good, innovative ideas, an understanding of the funding agency's mission and goals, and pay careful attention to the theme and requirements specified in the funding announcement. A good proposal should be compelling, understandable, well-organized, grammatically correct, and exhibit correct spelling, and it must meet the due date, formatting, and length requirements specified in the agency's guidelines.

If you've carefully read the agency's funding announcement and have specific questions about a proposal idea, consult the program officer at the funding agency for advice or clarification.

Most proposals contain common elements, such as the following:

  • A project summary that should clearly articulate the significance and innovation of the research and its expected outcomes;
  • A project description that details the goals of the project and how you will accomplish them, often including how you will evaluate the project and disseminate the research to various public audiences to meet "broader impacts" requirements;
  • References cited;
  • A budget that is in line with the award range of the funding program along with a detailed budget justification that has been developed in compliance with UD's current rates (see the "Proposal Tools and Data" sidebar on this Web page);
  • Biographical sketches of the project team; and
  • Letters of commitment/support from appropriate administrators and partnering institutions. Please note: To request a letter of support from the UD Vice Provost for Research Office, the Provost, or President, please follow this procedure:
    • Draft the letter of support
    • E-mail the letter to your contract-and-grant administrator in Research Office. To locate the correct staff member, see the Department Administrator directory in the Staff Directory.
    • If changes to the letter are required, you will be notified.
    • Research Office will shepherd the letter and proposal to the appropriate UD administrator for signature and provide a copy to you for your files.

If your proposal requires an evaluation component, an excellent resource to consult on campus is the UD Education Research and Development Center. If your proposal requires "Broader Impacts" in informal public education and outreach, a great external resource is the National Alliance for Broader Impacts Guiding Principles and Questions. Internally you are encouraged to contact the Research Communications Initiative in the UD Office of Communications and Marketing for advice. The office participates in selected proposals and also is aware of other units on campus who are involved in public education and outreach that may be available to assist you.

As you draft your proposal, make sure to cross-reference your content with key themes and requirements indicated in the funding announcement. Ask colleagues with experience writing winning proposals to read your draft and provide constructive criticism. You might also ask to serve on an upcoming proposal review panel for a particular agency to gain further insight into how proposals are evaluated.

Developing competitive research proposals is hard work, but the rewards can be great in terms of future discoveries. It's important not to discouraged if your proposal is not funded, but to learn from the experience and move on, for another opportunity likely lies just around the corner....

Please follow this link to Data Management Plans.

My proposal has been funded! Now what do I do?

At this point, notify Research Office, your dean, and departmental research administrator with the good news, as well as the UD Office of Communications & Marketing, which may issue a news release about your award.

You should then work closely with your departmental research administrator in establishing your research project account, or "Purpose," in UD PeopleSoft. You'll find all the guidelines for setting up the award, maintaining it, and closing it out in our online Grants Management Guide.

And while you may just be beginning your grant now, be sure to review the Grant Management Guide on "Protecting Your Results," which includes our online Intellectual Property Guide and important policies, and tour the Technology Marketplace.

Also, don't miss the "Presenting Your Results" section of the Researcher's Toolbox for helpful advice on preparing for media interviews, developing scientific posters, presenting public lectures, garnering UD and external media coverage of your research, and more.

Remember, research is an important part of our mission here at the University of Delaware, and you have serious responsibilities as a UD research investigator. We want to make sure you are familiar with our requirements and help facilitate your research success. If you have any questions, contact us at udresearch@udel.edu. Good luck with your research!

What is the difference between Post Doctoral Fellow and Post Doctoral Researcher?

Post Doctoral Fellow Guidelines


The title of "Post Doctoral Fellow" is designed for people who are at the University doing research primarily as independent learners, not on assigned projects as employees; the “Post Doctoral Fellow” designation is akin to an advanced graduate student, and the IRS specifically views post doctoral fellows as non-employees.

While there are Post Doctoral Fellows at the University who fit this description, there are also some who currently have this designation but are not eligible under existing UD policy, IRS regulations, or visa status.  These people must be handled differently.

Therefore, there exists the job title of "Post Doctoral Researcher" for researchers who are here primarily to work on assigned projects as employees for a limited period of time after having obtained their doctorates.

The characteristics of Post Doctoral Researchers are:

  • Professional position
  • Fiscal appointments
  • Requires doctorate
  • Minimum full-time annual rate of $33,097
  • Benefits will be charged in the same way as other professionals (this is a significant difference from post doctoral fellows)
  • Annual appointments, renewable up to 2 times for a total of three years; exceptions may be approved by the appropriate Dean
  • HR code information:
    • Job code: 299990
    • Salary plan:272 (full-time) or 273 (part-time)
    • Salary grade: 90

Questions regarding processing forms for post doctoral researchers, tax implications, etc., should be directed to HR systems administration. Questions concerning visa status should be directed to Foreign Student and Scholar Services.

Post Doctoral Researcher Implementation Guidelines


The position of Post Doctoral Researcher should be used when appropriate instead of Post Doctoral Fellow. The question of when this is appropriate is an academic judgment to be made primarily by the Dean in the context of the individual’s actual activities and Visa status. Post Doctoral Fellows’ primary responsibilities are comparable to those of graduate students: expanding their own knowledge, and often working with and guiding graduate and undergraduate students. The responsibilities of Post Doctoral Researchers are comparable to those of employees, where payment is dependent upon fulfilling an assigned work plan.

The following guidelines should be considered by Deans making the judgments.

  1. Individuals with H1B Visa status cannot appropriately be classified as Post Doctoral Fellows.
  2. For U.S. citizens and for others when Visa status is compliant, such as permanent residents and those who hold F-1 and J-1 Visa status, initial appointments may be made for one year as a Post Doctoral Fellow, as long as the Dean approves that this is consistent with the expectations of the appointment. The letter of appointment should stipulate the responsibilities in a manner that is congruent with such an appointment and should be signed, or otherwise approved, by the Dean.
  3. Beyond the initial year, Deans will determine on an empirical basis whether the appointment should be as Post Doctoral Fellow or Post Doctoral Researcher based on the actual activities of the individual. When Visa status is compliant, two years is expected to be the maximum length of time for someone to hold Post Doctoral Fellow status, unless there is continuing external funding specifically for a Post Doctoral Fellow for a longer period.
  4. When Visa status is compliant, current Post Doctoral Fellows should be reviewed by the Dean and a judgment should be made as to whether they are appropriately classified as Fellows, or whether they should be Post Doctoral Researchers or some other classification. The timing of that review may coincide with the end of the Post Doctoral Fellow’s current funding. That is, they may continue in this classification until the end date of their current funding source, at which point the Dean should review their classification in the context of the individual’s actual activities.

How do I gain secured access to the Grants system for proposal submission and inquiry?

Send an E-mail to ovpr-access@udel.edu. Provide the following in the body of the e-mail:
Name: Employee Name
EMPLID: XXXXX
User ID:
Role Name: Identify Role Name*
Instance: FIPRD
DepartmentID (numeric):

*Access roles (indicate which one(s) needed):
Grants - Research Administrators (Proposal entry and inquiry) GM_RESEARCH_ADMIN
Grants - Proposal Data Entry only GM_DATA_ENTRY Grants - Proposal Inquiry only GM_PROPOSAL_INQ

I have a Post-Doc listed in my NSF proposal budget. What should I include in my Mentoring Statement?

The attached "Sample" Mentoring Statement is not meant to be used as a UD standard but is meant to be used as guidance to assist faculty in meeting the NSF proposal requirement.

I am preparing a NIH application that involves human subjects and I see there is an entire section of the Research Plan that is devoted to Human Subjects. What should be addressed in this section?

In this section, you’re required to address three areas: inclusion of human subjects, inclusion of women and minorities, and inclusion of children. Please see the attached document for details on this section of the Research Plan.

Proposal Submission

1. How do I obtain access to People Soft grants module?

Please go to Employee Education & Development website and follow the link to Request Grants Administration Access under the section Financials.

2. How do I go about getting a letter of support for my research project from the UD administration (Deputy Provost for Research Office, Provost, or President)?

To request a letter of support from one of these individuals, please follow this procedure:

  1. Draft the letter of support
  2. E-mail the letter to your Contract and Grant Specialist in the Research Office. To locate the correct staff member, see the Department Administrator directory in the Staff Directory
  3. If changes to the letter are required, you will be notified
  4. The Research Office will shepherd the letter and proposal to the appropriate UD administrator for signature and provide a copy to you for your files

3. When do I need to route a Proposal Approval Form for signatures?

Any time a new proposal is submitted to a sponsor, or an increase in the funding or University resources occurs (in the case of a re-budget or renewal) a Proposal Approval (web) Form must be routed. In the case of a renewal where the resources are less than expected, or there is NO change, a form NEED NOT be routed.

4. Do Pre-Proposals require Research Office approval?

A Pre-proposals to a sponsor must go through the Research Office routing for approval and official submission through institutional signatures. Any time the University is obligating resources or requesting funds, the Research Office must be included in the submission.

5. I am preparing a Letter of Intent, does it have to be signed by Research Office?

Letters of Intent (LOI) that do not address funding amts. or UD commitments (ie; time commitments/match etc.) do not require signature of the Research Office (unless required by sponsor). However, the Research Office should be copied on the LOI. Typically, the purpose of this type of intent is for sponsor to determine the amount of man hours required for review process. Keep in mind that it is helpful to notify your Contract and Grant Specialist when you become aware of any proposal submissions.

6. What is the process for getting our new faculty access to Fastlane?

Send PI's name, birth date, type of degree and the year it was received to your Contract and Grants Specialist with a request to add the PI to FASTLANE. Please note Fastlane will provide the PI with a NSF login number that will become part of their personal logon process.

7. Who at the University of Delaware signs as the Authorized Representative for proposal applications?

Authorized Representative   Proposed First Year Total  
Contract and Grant Specialist   Up to $250,000 
Assistant Director, Pre-Award Up to $500,000
Jeff Friedland, Associate Vice President, Research Administration   Up to $1,000,000 
Charles G. Riordan, Vice President for Research, Scholarship & Innovation Up to $1,000,000 
Robin Morgan, Provost Over $1,000,000 
Dennis Assanis, President Over $2,000,000

8. How do I gain secured access to the Grants system for proposal submission and inquiry?

Send an E-mail to ovpr-access@udel.edu. Provide the following in the body of the e-mail:

Name: Employee Name

EMPLID: XXXXX

User ID:

Role Name: Identify Role Name*

Instance: FIPRD

DepartmentID (numeric):

*Access roles (indicate which one(s) needed): Grants - Research Administrators (Proposal entry and inquiry)

GM_RESEARCH_ADMIN

Grants - Proposal Data Entry only GM_DATA_ENTRY

Grants - Proposal Inquiry only GM_PROPOSAL_INQ

9. What is the procedure for a Sponsored Research Program Income?

For information on Sponsored Research Program Income Procedures, follow this link.

10. How to avoid common problems and increase submission success regarding PDF documents?

How to avoid common problems and increase submission success regarding PDF documents, we offer the following tips:

To easily create PDFs from other documents (including creating ‘flat’ PDFs from PDFs with active fields), you can use a standalone PDF creation utility such as those recommended by Grants.gov, or built-in features such as “Save as PDF” in other software programs. Give the document a short and unique attachment name using letters, numbers, and underscores.

When submitting to NIH, follow their PDF submission guidelines to prevent problems. Avoid ‘bundling’ multiple PDFs into a single file or producing PDFs by scanning printed documents. Disable any security features in the document. Do not attach PDFs that contain “stamps” (commonly used for signatures) or other comments. PDF files submitted to the eRA Commons are converted to images, and applications not following these guidelines may not convert correctly. It is always advisable to review your submitted application in the eRA Commons system and check that attachments were transmitted accurately.

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