Preserving culture

by | July 24, 2018

Preserving Culture

ABOVE: UD Prof. Joyce Hill Stoner (top) guides students working on a conservation treatment for a diorama of an Arctic expedition by African American explorer Matthew Henson and fellow explorer Robert Peary. | Photo by Evan Krape

Program focuses on art conservation, professional diversity

The 13 students from historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) who came to the University of Delaware for a special program in art conservation this summer had remarkably varied backgrounds.

The group included a business administration student who fell in love with art after taking her first elective, a psychology and political science major now participating in a leadership development program, a graphic designer and painter, a 15-year resident of Japan and a decorated military combat photographer.

But they shared at least two things: They wanted to learn more about the field of art conservation, and all came highly recommended by their home institutions.

“This is an impeccable group of kids,” said Kristin DeGhetaldi, a UD master’s and doctoral alumna who co-taught the students’ introductory class. “They’re all very accomplished.”

The program, supported by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation and offered in collaboration with the HBCU Alliance of Museums and Art Galleries, is designed to expose talented students to art conservation as an academic discipline and a potential career.

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