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A Blog Devoted to UD Innovation, Excellence and Scholarship
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Research & Discovery

A Blog Devoted to UD Innovation, Excellence and Scholarship

Chemours announces plan to build at Star Campus

by | October 30, 2017

ABOVE: Among the doctoral students who work in the microbiology lab of Prof. Ramona Neunuebel (center) are (left to right): Rebecca Noll, Samual Allgood, Barbara Romero-Dueñas and Colleen Pike. | Photo by Evan Krape

Government officials hail decision as major economic and academic development win for the state

The Chemours Company today announced that it has entered into an agreement to build a state-of-the-art research and innovation facility on the University of Delaware’s Science, Technology and Advanced Research (STAR) Campus.

“The University of Delaware is excited to welcome Chemours to the STAR Campus, where we are creating a bold future of innovation for our state and region,” said UD President Dennis Assanis. “Not only will the University’s students and faculty benefit from this vibrant new research partnership, but, together, we will be making our entire economy stronger and more resilient for years to come.”

When fully operational, the project will establish a world-class innovation partnership and talent development pipeline between Chemours and UD. It will also keep 330 researcher and technician jobs in the Wilmington metro area. Construction on the new 312,000-square-foot facility, representing an investment of approximately $150 million, is expected to begin this year; plans call for it to be completed by early 2020.

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