Forms, Policies & Procedures

Here you will find a repository of forms, policies and procedures related to research at the University of Delaware. This repository draws on sources throughout campus to provide quick and easy access to these resources in a variety of formats, such as html, MSWord and Adobe PDF. We encourage you to explore and use the tools provided to narrow your search by word, resource type or category in order to learn more about the content that governs research at UD.
FILTER BY
RO Forms, Policies, and Procedures Search 2019

Animal Subjects in Research

For Forms, Policies and Procedures pertaining to Animal Subjects in Research and other resources

Click Here

Conflict of Interest
Contracts and Grant Management
Effort Certification
Export Regulations (ITAR/EAR/OFAC)
Human Subjects in Research
Intellectual Property
Internal Funding
Material Transfer
Reporting Misconduct
Research Administration
Research Agreement Templates
RO Forms, Policies, and Procedures Search 2019
Forms, Policies and Procedures (85 Entries)
Policy: Safety
Confined Space Entry
Policy

Confined Space Entry

  1. PURPOSE
    To ensure all activities requiring entry into a confined space are conducted in a manner consistent with established safety procedures so as to minimize risk to workers.
  2. DEFINITION
    A confined space means a space that: is large enough and so configured that an employee can bodily enter and perform assigned work; and has limited or restricted means for entry or exit; and is not designed for continuous employee occupancy.

    1. Permit-required confined space means a confined space that has one or more of the following characteristics:
      1. Contains or has the potential to contain a hazardous atmosphere;
      2. Contains a material that has the potential for engulfing an entrant;
      3. Has an internal configuration such that an entrant could be trapped or asphyxiated by inwardly converging walls or by a floor which slopes downward and tapers to a smaller cross-section;
      4. Contains any other recognized serious safety or health hazard.
    2. A non-permit confined space means a confined space that does not contain or, with respect to atmospheric hazards, have the potential to contain any hazard capable of causing death or serious physical harm.Activities to be conducted in the confined space determines the classification of the space.
    3. A confined space includes, but is not limited to, any of the following if the criteria set forth in the above definition are met:
      1. Storage tanks, tank cars, process vessels, bins, tank trailers, and other tank-like compartments usually with one or more manholes for entry;
      2. Open-topped spaces of more than 4 feet in depth, such as bins, silos, pits, vats, tubs, vaults, vessels, floating roof storage tanks, or trenches;
      3. Ventilation or exhaust ducts, manholes, sewers, tunnels, pipelines, and similar structures;
      4. Ovens, furnaces, kilns, boilers and similar structures.
  3. POLICY
    1. No person shall enter a confined space except with the approval of or in accordance with procedures established by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
    2. Confined Space Entry Permits shall be completed in accordance with the established procedures and filed with the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
    3. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety may evaluate confined spaces and shall audit all confined space activities.
    4. Contractors and Subcontractors shall be subject to this policy.

For a copy of the confined space procedures or more information regarding this policy, contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (ext. 8475).

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-36

ORIGINATION DATE: June 5, 1989

REVISION DATE(S):

1-May-96

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Control of Biohazards in Research and Education
Policy

Control of Biohazards in Research and Education

  1. PURPOSE
    To ensure all activities related to the use of biological materials are conducted in a safe manner as well as in compliance with all applicable federal, state, local and University regulations.
  2. POLICY
    No person shall purchase, receive, possess, use, transfer, or dispose of any biological materials except with the approval of and in accordance with procedures established by the University Biosafety Committee and the Department of Environmental Health and Safety. Certain work outlined in the Biosafety Manual will require the approval of these organizations.

    For more information regarding the University Biosafety program and to access the University Biosafety Manual or contact the Department of Environmental Health and Safety (ext. 8475).

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-19

ORIGINATION DATE: September 15, 1977

REVISION DATE(S):

June 5, 1989; January 12, 1999; March 27, 2003; May 8, 2003; February 10, 2014

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Department Safety Committee Policy
Policy

Department Safety Committee Policy

  1. PURPOSE
    This policy is developed to provide guidance to Department Safety Committees by establishing uniform administrative procedures and minimum requirements. It is the Department Safety Committee’s charge along with the Department of Environmental Health and Safety to provide the University Community with a safe and healthful work environment. It is also the intent of the Department Safety Committee to assure compliance with all University Safety Policies.
  2. DEFINITION
    Department as used in this policy is interpreted as any department, center, program institute, unit, station, school or office.
  3. POLICY
    1. Establishment of CommitteesWhile all departments are encouraged to have Safety Committees, departments designated by the Director of Environmental Health and Safety shall establish Department Safety Committees. A list of current department safety committees can be found at Environmental Health and Safety web site.
    2. Establishment of ContactsDepartment heads or his/her designee will serve as the Safety contact in all University departments who do not have safety committees. These contacts will receive communications from the Department of Environmental Health and Safety regarding safety issues and serve as the safety liaison for their department. A list of current department safety contacts can be found at Environmental Health and Safety web site.
    3. MembershipDepartment heads shall appoint Safety Committee members and designate a Chairperson. The names of committee members shall be forwarded to the Director of Environmental Health and Safety each year by June 30. Terms shall be at the discretion of the Department Head.The Director of the Department of Environmental Health and Safety or their designee shall serve as an ex officio member on all Safety Committees.Department Safety Committee membership should, when applicable, include representatives of the professional staff, faculty, salaried staff, hourly employees and students.
    4. MeetingsDepartment Safety Committees shall meet periodically at a frequency determined by the committee, but not less than four times per year. By June 30 each year Safety Committee Chairs shall communicate to the Director of Environmental Health and Safety the months in which meetings are planned for the next fiscal year. Minutes shall be recorded. Minutes should include members attending, members absent, disposition of old business and new business covering items identified under Minimum Requirements (section IV).
    5. Annual ReportIndividual departments shall submit an annual report of their committee’s activities to the Department of Environmental Health and Safety. The reports are to be submitted using the forms developed by Environmental Health and Safety which can be found at Environmental Health and Safety web site. These reports are due by June 30 for the previous year. A summary of these reports is presented to the Risk Management Advisory Council annually.

      Annual reports shall include:

      1. List of committee members and chair
      2. Meeting dates
      3. Summary of committee activities including but not limited to:
        1. Summary reports of department accidents/ injuries and actions taken to prevent further accidents/injuries.
        2. Summary report of facility inspections completed.
        3. Status report on activities conducted by the departmental Chemical Hygiene Officer.
        4. Summary report on departmental safety training completed.
        5. List of any departmental policies established regarding safety.
        6. Status report on compliance with Personal Protective Equipment Policy.
        7. Summary report of all department training activities with regard to disaster planning.
    6. Recordkeeping

      All Safety Committee records shall be kept on file in the department for 36 months. Training certificates must be sent to the Department of Environmental Health and Safety within 5 days of the training session. Copies should be kept on file in the department for the current year and the previous year. The Department of Environmental Health and Safety is responsible for submitting the record copy of training certificates and annual reports to the University Archives.

  4. MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS
    EnvironmentalHealth and Safety has outlined the requirements for safety committees on the following web site: Environmental Health and Safety.

    1. Assure safety inspections of operations and facilities including shops, storage and storeroom areas, teaching and research laboratories, and offices, are conducted. Inspections shall be conducted quarterly. See Research and chemical laboratory inspection and facility inspection.
    2. Recommend and/or develop safe practices and procedures for department activities. Job Hazard Analyses need to be completed for all activities with personal protective equipment requirements specified. See Personal Protective Equipment.
    3. Safety committee members should assist supervisors with enforcement of safety policies by educating fellow employees in proper procedures. See Safety Policy.
    4. Address the safety concerns of fellow department members as well as those raised by the Department Chair and Environmental Health and Safety.
    5. Track and investigate trends in workplace accidents/ injuries. Conduct accident/injury investigations. File accident investigation reports and send copies to the Department of Environmental Health and Safety for review.
    6. Receive reports from the Chemical Hygiene Officer regarding annual training, review of purchase requisitions for chemicals, reviews of experimental protocols for hazard identification, review of any medical evaluation requests, exposure evaluation requests, and availability of facility safety equipment.
    7. Review Emergency Response information with the department annually. See Emergency Response/Fire–Other Emergencies.
    8. Assure required safety training is provided to department members as indicated by applicable safety programs. See Environmental Health and Safety for applicable training requirements.
    9. Assure a copy of the Department Workplace Chemical List is updated and forwarded to the Department of Environmental Health and Safety annually.
    10. Monitor compliance with other safety programs that may be applicable within the department, i.e., Bloodborne Pathogens, Underground Storage Tank Management, Compressed Gas Safety, etc. See Section 7 of the University Policies and Procedures Manual.
    11. Maintain communications with department staff, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety and Facilities Management concerning the quality of the work environment. This includes indoor air quality, ergonomics, thermal comfort, etc.
    12. Perform other safety related functions as may be assigned by the Department Head or recommended by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.

Additional questions or comments should be directed to the Director of Environmental Health and Safety.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-02

ORIGINATION DATE: September 1, 1988

REVISION DATE(S):

June 5, 1989; December 18, 1991; November 1994; August 1999; January 9, 2006; February 10, 2014

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Driver’s Requirements and Verification
Policy

Driver’s Requirements and Verification

  1. PURPOSE
    To provide reasonable assurance that each individual who operates any motor vehicle on university business possesses a valid license of the appropriate classification and to minimize the University’s liability in motor vehicle accidents.
  2. POLICY
    1.  Definition
      1. A University Driver is a person who operates a University-owned, -rented, -leased, or personal vehicle on a permanent or intermittent basis on University business, including motor pool vehicles.
      2. A University Vehicle is any owned, rented, or leased vehicle used on University business
    2. General

      All University Drivers shall be in compliance with all applicable provisions found in Delaware Motor Vehicle Code Title 21 and Federal Motor Vehicle Regulations Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations, with respect to licensing and classification requirements. (1)

    3. Specific
      1. No person may drive any motor vehicle on University business without holding a valid driver’s license, applicable endorsements and valid classification for the vehicle they are driving. The driver’s license shall be in their possession while operating the motor vehicle.
      2. No person whose license has been revoked or suspended shall operate a motor vehicle as a University Driver before obtaining a valid license through the proper reinstatement procedures.
      3. A University Driver holding a driver license issued by any state, who is charged with violating any state law or local ordinance relating to motor traffic control, in this or any other state while driving a University Vehicle, shall notify their department of such charges before the end of the business day following the day of the violation. The University Driver shall provide a written report to their department within three business days of the violation upon returning to campus. The report shall include the time, date, and location of the violation, the names of passengers, and the name of the investigating authority.
      4. Any University Driver who has their license or driving privileges suspended, revoked, or canceled or who has been issued an out-of-state order from driving a motor vehicle must notify his/her department of the fact immediately during operating hours or upon the start of the next business day. The department will report the information to the Office of Risk Management by the start of the next business day.
      5. A University Driver holding a commercial driver license issued by any state who is convicted of violating any state law or local ordinance relating to motor traffic control, in this or any other state, other than parking violations, shall notify the Division of Motor Vehicles of the issuing state in writing within 30 days of the conviction.
      6. All reports and violation records shall be held confidential and maintained by the University Driver’s department for a period of three years.
      7. Any University Driver in a University-owned, -rented, or -leased vehicle who is involved in an accident, no matter how minor, shall report it immediately to their department, during operating hours, or immediately upon the start of the next business day. The department shall notify Transportation Services immediately. The driver shall report personally to the Motor Pool to complete an accident report.
    4. Departments shall audit and verify that each new University driver who operates a University Vehicle holds a valid driver’s license of the appropriate classification. [See Section II .F.]
    5. Motor Pool Vehicles – Rentals
      1. No University motor pool vehicle shall be issued to any person without a valid drivers license in their possession.
      2. Departments renting motor pool vehicles shall ensure that any person authorized or designated to operate a motor pool vehicle holds a valid driver’s license of appropriate classification and that the license is in his/her immediate possession while operating the vehicle.
    6. Semiannual Driver’s License Audits
      1. During the months of September and March of each year, departments shall conduct driver’s license audits of all employees who operate University Vehicles, except motor pool vehicles.
      2. The audit record will contain the employee’s verification of compliance with this policy and will contain the following information (which is found on the driver’s license):
        1. audit date,
        2. name of driver
        3. driver’s license number
        4. issuing state
        5. expiration date
        6. classification and
        7. signature of the auditor and the employee.
      3. Audit records shall be held confidential and shall be maintained by the driver’s department for a period of three years.
    7. Violations
      1. A University Driver, while driving a University Vehicle, who is convicted of violating any state law or local ordinance relating to motor vehicle traffic control, in this or any other state, may have their driving record reviewed by their department or the Office of Risk Management.
      2. A University Driver, while driving a University Vehicle, who has their license suspended, revoked, or canceled may be disciplined up to and including termination.
      3. In accordance with University insurance coverage, a University Driver who has been convicted or has pled guilty to DUI/DWI or an offense of similar magnitude will not be permitted to operate any vehicle, including personal vehicles, on University business until that offense is completely cleared from the person’s license, regardless of whether or not the person’s license has been reissued, or they have been issued a work permit. This process may take as long as five years.
      4. All motor vehicle or parking violations by a University Driver in a University Vehicle shall be paid promptly. This does not prevent a University Driver from using the court process to contest motor vehicle or parking violations through established procedures.

(1) Questions pertaining to Driver’s Licensing and classification can be referred to the Delaware Division of Motor Vehicles.

Questions pertaining to insurance coverage can be referred to the Office of Risk Management, 302-831-2971.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Facilities, Real Estate and Auxiliary Services Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Facilities, Real Estate and Auxiliary Services

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): Jul-34

ORIGINATION DATE: June 5, 1989

REVISION DATE(S):

September 1997; October 14, 2003; December 3, 2004; July 1, 2005; May, 2007

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Drug/Alcohol Testing – Commercial Driver’s Licenses and Safety Sensitive Functions
Policy

Drug/Alcohol Testing – Commercial Driver’s Licenses and Safety Sensitive Functions

  1. SCOPE OF POLICY
    This policy applies to the Employees Subject to Testing identified below and is intended to comply with the Omnibus Transportation Employee Testing Act of 1991 (“OTETA”) and in accordance with Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 382 and 391, Subpart H.
  2. DEFINITIONS
    1. Accident – Any on-the-job occurrence involving an employee defined above as being in a driving position, operating a University commercial motor vehicle which results in a fatality, bodily injury or property damage, where the driver’s performance could have contributed to the accident.
    2. Alcohol – The intoxicating agent in beverage alcohol or ethyl alcohol or other low molecular weight alcohol, including methyl and isopropyl alcohol. Note: This also includes medications, prescription or non-prescription, which contain alcohol.
    3. Chain of Custody – Procedures to account for the integrity of each urine or blood specimen by tracking its handling and storage from the point of collection to its final disposition.
    4. Commercial Motor Vehicle- A motor vehicle or combination of vehicles used in commerce if the motor vehicle:
      1. has a gross combination weight rating of 26,001 or more pounds inclusive of a towed unit with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,001 or more pounds; or
      2. has a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 26,001 or more pounds; or
      3. is designed to transport more than 16 passengers, including the driver; or
      4. is of any size and is used in the transportation of materials found to be hazardous for the purpose of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act and which require the motor vehicle to be placarded.
    5. Controlled Substances – Drugs required by OTETA to be included in the testing process. These drugs are as follows: marijuana, cocaine, opiates, phencyclidine (PCP) and amphetamines.
    6. Driver- Any person who operates a University commercial motor vehicle, including but not limited to full-time, regularly employed drivers, casual, intermittent or occasional drivers, and I or any person who operates a University commercial motor vehicle at the direction or with the consent of the University.
    7. Driving Function- Means any of those on-duty functions listed below. On-duty functions mean all time from when the driver begins to work or is required to be in a readiness to work until the time they are relieved from work and include:
      1. All time at the facility waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty;
      2. All time inspecting equipment as required by federal regulations or otherwise inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time;
      3. All time driving;
      4. All time, with the exception of sleep time in vehicles, other than driving time, in or upon any commercial motor vehicle;
      5. All time loading or unloading a vehicle, supervising or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remaining in readiness to operate the vehicle, or in giving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded;
      6. All time spent performing the driver requirements related to an accident;
      7. All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled vehicle.
    8. Employees Subject to Testing – Full-time, part-time, miscellaneous wage, casual wage, temporary or seasonal employees, who possess a commercial driver’s license (CDL) with the intent of operating a University commercial motor vehicle (this includes any rented leased, or personal vehicle used as a requirement of their job function) requiring such license, as well as employees performing safety sensitive functions, are subject to testing. This includes, but is not necessarily limited to, employees in the following positions:
      1. Arborist
      2. Arborist Helper
      3. Bus Driver
      4. Caretaker
      5. Casual Wage Bus Driver
      6. Farm Assistant
      7. Farm Manager
      8. Groundskeeper (including employees who are not mandated to maintain a CDL, yet choose to do so)
      9. Grounds, Equipment Mechanic
      10. Grounds Technician
      11. Research Associate, AG
      12. Research Associate II, Mechanical Engineering
      13. Sr. Vehicle Technician
      14. Sport Turf Technician
      15. Sport Turf Technician Assistant
      16. Vehicle Technician
      17. Well Driller, DE Geological Survey

        All Departments are required to advise the University’s Department of Transportation’s (DOT) On-site Coordinator of all employees required to possess a CDL, as a condition of employment.

    9. Medical Review Officer (MRO) – A licensed physician responsible for the collection of test results generated pursuant to this policy who has knowledge of substance abuse disorders and has appropriate medical training to interpret and evaluate an individual’s confirmed positive result together with his/her medical history and any other relevant biomedical information.
    10. Performing – A driver is considered to be performing a driving function during the periods in which they are actually performing, ready to perform, or immediately ready to perform any of those on-duty functions (1) through (7) listed in the definition of driving functions.
    11. Reasonable Suspicion – Belief that the driver has or may be violating the alcohol or controlled substances prohibitions, based on specific, contemporaneous, articulated observations concerning appearance, behavior, speech or body odors of the driver.
    12. Refusal to Submit to Testing – Includes
      1. failure to provide adequate breath for testing without a valid medical explanation after receiving notice of the requirement of breath testing;
      2. failure to provide adequate urine for controlled substance testing without a valid medical explanation after receiving notice of the requirement of urine testing; or
      3. conduct that clearly obstructs the testing
    13. Safety Sensitive Function – Means any of those on-duty functions listed below.
      1. Safety-sensitive function means all time from the time an employee/driver begins to work or is required to be in readiness to work until the time he/she is relieved from work and all responsibility for performing work. Safety-sensitive functions shall include: All time at an employer or shipper plant, terminal, facility, or other property, or on any public property, waiting to be dispatched, unless the driver has been relieved from duty by the employer;
      2. All time inspecting equipment as required by Sections 392.7 and 392.8 of the Department of Transportation’s subchapter or otherwise inspecting, servicing, or conditioning any commercial motor vehicle at any time;
      3. All time spent at the driving controls of a commercial motor vehicle in operation; all time, other than driving time, in or upon any commercial motor vehicle except time spent resting in a sleeper berth (a berth conforming to the requirements of Sec. 393.76 of the Department of Transportation’s subchapter);
      4. All time loading or unloading a vehicle, supervising, or assisting in the loading or unloading, attending a vehicle being loaded or unloaded, remaining in readiness to operate the vehicle, or in giving or receiving receipts for shipments loaded or unloaded; and
      5. All time repairing, obtaining assistance, or remaining in attendance upon a disabled vehicle.
    14. Substance Abuse Professional (“SAP”) – A licensed medical doctor or a licensed or certified psychologist, social worker, employee assistance professional or addiction counselor (certified by the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors Certification Commission) with knowledge of and clinical experience in the diagnosis and treatment of alcohol and controlled substance-related disorders. The substance abuse professional is that person(s) assigned to maintain the records required by federal law regarding the implementation of OTETA.
    15. Test Collection Site – That facility or facilities selected by the University to perform alcohol and/or controlled substances tests in full compliance with OTETA.
  3. POLICY STATEMENT
    The University of Delaware recognizes the importance of safety protocols for employees operating University Commercial Motor Vehicles and other employees performing safety sensitive functions and intends to follow all laws, rules and regulations applicable to such activities through application of this policy.
  4. POLICY STANDARDS AND PROCEDURES
    1. PROHIBITIONS
      1. Alcohol -No driver shall:
        1. report to duty or remain on duty while having an alcohol concentration of 0.02 or higher
        2. possess alcohol while on duty
        3. use alcohol while on duty
        4. perform driving functions or safety sensitive functions within 4 hours of using alcohol
        5. use alcohol within 8 hours after an accident or until undergoing an alcohol test
        6. refuse to submit to an alcohol test
          1. Refusal is proof of positive test results.
      2. Controlled Substances – No University employee shall report for duty or remain on duty requiring the performance of driving or safety sensitive functions when the employee uses any controlled substance except when the use is pursuant to the instructions of a physician (and is verifiable) who has advised the employee that the substance does not adversely affect the employee’s ability to safely operate a commercial motor vehicle. (Note: Burden of verifiable proof is on the employee, to the satisfaction of the employer.) No employee shall report for work, remain at work or perform a driving or safety sensitive function if he/she tests positive for controlled substance as defined.
    2. TESTING PROCEDURES

      All testing required by this policy will be conducted in accordance with OTETA. The testing will only be conducted by certified, qualified individuals who are contracted by the University for this purpose.

    3. TYPES OF TESTING
      1. Pre-employment/Promotion/Transfer
        1. Testing that occurs before an applicant is hired, after a conditional offer has been extended to hire, or after an employee has been promoted or transferred, and before the employee actually performs a driving function in the position for the first time. No employee shall operate in a driving function unless their breath alcohol concentration is less than 0.02 and they have a negative controlled substance report.
      2. Reasonable Suspicion
        1. Testing that occurs when a trained supervisor or other trained official believes an employee has violated this policy, based upon specific, contemporaneous, articulated observations concerning the appearance, behavior speech or body odors of the driver. Ordinarily, testing based upon reasonable suspicion should be performed within two (2) hours following the observations, but in no instance shall testing be conducted after eight (8) or more hours have elapsed.Any employee whose breath alcohol content is greater than 0.02 will be prohibited from performing functions until their next scheduled work day and only after subsequent testing.
        2. A reasonable suspicion determination shall only be made by a supervisor or other official that has completed the federally required training (Federal regulations require at least 60 minutes of training on alcohol misuse and at least 60 minutes of training on controlled substances use before a person can be designated to determine whether reasonable suspicion exists to require a driver to undergo alcohol or controlled substances testing. The training covers the physical, behavioral, speech, and performance indicators of probable alcohol misuse and use of controlled substances.) on the symptoms of alcohol or controlled substance abuse, or a police officer. Whenever possible, a supervisor’s reasonable suspicion should be confirmed by a second trained observer, before requiring a driver to undergo alcohol or controlled substances testing. However, if a second trained observer is not available, any supervisor who has completed the federally required training on the symptoms of alcohol or controlled substance abuse may act as a trained observer. A police officer’s determination of a reasonable suspicion does not require a second opinion.
        3. When a supervisor, manager or department director has a reasonable suspicion that a CDL employee or an employee performing a safety sensitive function may be in violation of this policy, they will transport the employee to the test collection site.
        4. Post-Accident TestingPost-accident testing will be conducted for all accidents when:
          1. the employee is cited for a moving violation of any kind;
          2. any involved vehicle requires towing from the scene; or
          3. any person involved requires medical treatment away from the scene of the accident.

            Post-accident testing will be conducted in all fatal accidents, even if the driver is not cited for a moving violation.Any employee involved in an accident must remain available for testing, up to a maximum of eight hours. Any employee who refuses to remain available will be considered to have refused to submit to testing.

          4. Random TestingTesting that is conducted on an unannounced basis just before, during or after the performance of a driving function or safety sensitive function.
            1. Rate of testing- random alcohol and controlled substance testing shall be administered at an annual rate of at least 50 percent of the average number of driver or safety sensitive positions, throughout the University.
            2. Such testing will be unannounced and reasonably spread throughout the calendar year.
            3. The selection of drivers shall be based upon a random computer-generated list. Each driver will have an equal chance of being selected each time a list is generated.
            4. Any employee selected for testing will immediately report to the designated testing facility.
    4. REVIEW OF TEST RESULTS

      All drug test results will be reviewed by the MRO designated by the University before the results are reported to the University. If the testing facility reports a positive test to the MRO, the MRO will contact the employee to determine if there is an alternative medical explanation for the positive test result. If the employee gives a reasonable and verifiable explanation, the results of the test are reported as negative to the University. In the event the employee is unable to give an alternative medical explanation for the positive test result, the MRO will report the positive test immediately to the University of Delaware’s DOT on-site coordinator who will inform the employee’s department head or designee.

    5. CONSEQUENCES OF A POSITIVE TEST
      1. Any employee found to be in violation of the policy will be subject to discipline up to and including dismissal.
      2. The University may condition continued employment of an employee found to be in violation of this policy upon the employee’s treatment for alcohol or drug problems. In such cases, the University will require the employee to comply fully with all requirements and recommendations of the treatment facility. Failure on the part of the employee to comply with these recommendations will be considered a violation of this policy which may result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.
      3. Rehabilitation with University assistance may be provided from outpatient counseling to admission to a treatment center selected by the University for a period of not more than 30 days or may include counseling sessions with a Substance Abuse Professional (SAP) while continuing normal duties of employment.  An employee who consents to being admitted to a treatment center shall be placed on leave with pay status; provided the employee has accumulated sick leave and vacation days that shall be utilized when available. Employees must adhere to all follow-up guidelines established by an outside professional in rehabilitation counseling. This policy is in accordance with the established University’s Substance Abuse Policy.
    6. RETURN TO WORK AND FOLLOW-UP

      Before a an employee has violated this policy returns to duty requiring the performance of a driving or safety sensitive, the employee shall undergo an alcohol test with a result indicating an alcohol concentration of less than 0.02 and a controlled substances test with a negative result. The employee must submit to a minimum of six (6) unannounced follow-up tests within the first twelve (12) months after returning to work as indicated by the Substance Abuse Professional (SAP).The fee of the initial evaluation is the responsibility of the employee and the fees of the minimum of (6) unannounced follow-up tests are paid by the University.

    7. UNION REPRESENTATION

      Employees covered by a collective bargaining agreement who are required to submit to an alcohol or controlled substance test pursuant to this policy may request union representation at such testing, provided such representation can be obtained within one-half hour of the employee being notified of the need for testing.

    8. CONFIDENTIALITY
      1. All employee alcohol and drug testing results and records will be kept with the strictest confidentiality by the University separate and apart from the employee’s personnel file. The University will release the information to supervisors I managers on a need-to-know Any other release of information by the University will be made only with specific written consent from the employee.
      2. All records regarding this policy will be maintained by the University of Delaware’s DOT on-site Coordinator.
      3. In the event the employee initiates a grievance, lawsuit or any other proceeding that will require a hearing, the University may release relevant information.
      4. Relevant information may also be released by the University to any local, state or federal agency to demonstrate compliance with all rules and regulations.
    9. EMPLOYEE ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
      1. Employees are encouraged to voluntarily seek assistance in dealing with substance abuse. Confidential professional assistance, treatment, planning, and rehabilitation services are available through the University’s Employee Assistance Program, hms, A Health Advocate Company at 800-343- 2186 or hms.HealthAdvocate.com.
      2. The request for assistance for a substance abuse problem will not, in itself, be considered grounds for disciplinary action. A request for assistance will not prevent the taking of appropriate disciplinary action for misconduct or performance problems which may be related to substance abuse.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Human Resources Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Human Resources

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): Jul-44

ORIGINATION DATE: February 1, 1999

REVISION DATE(S):

July 2015; March 2016; July 2016

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Emergency Management Policy
Policy

Emergency Management Policy

  1. OBJECTIVE
    1. The State of Delaware can be threatened by emergency and disaster situations both natural, such as flash floods, hurricanes, winter storms and fires, and man-made, such as hazardous materials accidents, nuclear releases, civil disorders and terrorist threats.
    2. Because the University of Delaware differs in size, complexity, and function from public agencies in the State of Delaware and the County of New Castle, it is prudent for the University to develop an emergency management program of its own to focus on disaster preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation.
  2. POLICY
    1. In March 2007, the University created the Emergency Preparedness Coordinator position within the Department of Public Safety. This position, now known as the Emergency Preparedness Manager, reports to the Executive Director of Campus and Public Safety. The Emergency Preparedness Manager is responsible for:
      1. Providing basic guidelines for emergency planning, response, mitigation, and recovery/continuity of operations, as well as reviewing completed plans, coordinating emergency planning, conducting training and related exercises with other jurisdictions and agencies, and responding to assist in the management of emergency incidents; and
      2. Developing and administering the following University emergency plans:
        1. The University of Delaware Emergency Operations Plan;
        2. The University of Delaware All Hazard Mitigation Plan;
        3. The University of Delaware Continuity of Operations Plan; and
        4. The University of Delaware Continuity of Government Plan.
      3. The University of Delaware Emergency Operations Plan (“UD EOP”) is the official emergency operations plan for the University). The purpose of the UD EOP is to provide guidance and structure to the operational and administrative response of the University academic and administrative departments in crisis situations that require activation of part or all of the EOP or the Emergency Operations Center (EOC).
      4. All suggestions, recommendations or requests for change to the UD EOP or any other University emergency plan should be submitted in writing to the Emergency Preparedness Manager at the University of Delaware Office of Campus and Public Safety, who shall submit changes to the Executive Director of Campus and Public Safety and the Executive Vice President for approval.
  3. LINKS TO RELATED PLANS AND PROGRAMS
    1. Critical Incident Management Plan
    2. State of Delaware Emergency Operations Plan (DEOP), 2009
    3. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) Standard 1600
  4. SPECIFIC AUTHORITY
    1. State of Delaware Code, Chapter 31, Emergency Management
    2. Public Law 93-288, Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act
    3. Public Law 107-609, Homeland Security Act of 2002
    4. Public Law 106-390, Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000

Questions related to this policy should be directed to: Executive Director of Campus and Public Safety

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Campus and Public Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-54

ORIGINATION DATE: May 3, 2013

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Emergency Notification Policy
Policy

Emergency Notification Policy

  1. INTRODUCTION
    The University of Delaware is responsible for providing accurate and timely information to the campus community and the public during emergencies. The University is also responsible to students, faculty, and staff when they express concerns about personal safety and security, and consistent with University policies concerning the release of personal information. This Emergency Notification Policy specifies policies and procedures for facilitating the communication of critical emergency information. The policy utilizes the best science and technology available in order to ensure that the University can notify both University and other interested parties of an emergency and provide appropriate direction on how to avoid potential harm.
  2. PURPOSE
    The University’s approach to crisis incidents follows the Phases of Emergency Management as addressed in the full University Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) and Critical Incident Management Plan (CIMP). These documents can be found online at www.udel.edu/safety/plans. This supplemental document builds on the principles found in these documents and is designed to achieve a comprehensive, coordinated approach to communications that will:

    1. Disseminate clear and accurate information to interested constituencies and the public at large.
    2. Assist in the management of crises.
    3. Provide direction to faculty, staff, and students.
    4. Reduce rumor and uncertainty and,
    5. Maintain the institution’s credibility and minimize damage to its reputation.
  3. DEFINITIONS
    1. Urgent message means a message related to an event, expected or unexpected, that threatens life or safety and require immediate action. An urgent message is a message that requires the recipient to react immediately.
    2. Informational message means a message related to a situation that does not present a threat, but as to which the campus community has a right to know. This adheres to the requirements in the Clery Act.
    3. Quick acting tool means a notification tool that can be promptly initiated, take minimal time to deploy and reach a broad audience.
    4. Additional tool means a notification tool that may be time consuming to deploy, take longer to initiate, and have a limited audience.
  4. ACTIVATION DECISION TREE
    1. The process to activate a quick acting tool employs the following work flow:
      1. Situation is identified by a University Department/Unit.
      2. Situation is related to Public Safety or Communications and Marketing.
      3. A conference occurs between:
        1. Chief of Police;
        2. Executive Director of Campus and Public Safety
        3. Vice President for Communications and Marketing
        4. General Counsel;
        5. Dean of Students; and
        6. Other Subject-Matter Experts (SMEs) as needed.
    2. Decision is made whether to send a notification or not.
      1. If yes:
        1. Determination of type of notification urgent message or informational message;
        2. Determination of speed of delivery (quick acting or additional);
        3. Determination of content of message;
        4. Notification tool or tools are chosen based on the discussion above and;
        5. A member of Campus and Public Safety or Communication and Marketing is delegated to activate notification tool or tools
      2. If no:
        1. the decision is documented.
    3. TABLE AND LIST OF NOTIFICATION TOOLS

      Table of Notification Tools

      Situation/Tools Quick Acting Additional
      Urgent Send Word Now
      Classroom Projection Override
      Emergency Homepage
      Facebook
      Twitter
      Carillon System
      Local Radio Stations
      Area TV Stations
      Digital Signs
      Voicemail System
      Informational UD Homepage
      Crime Alert Emails
      PO Box Group Email System
      Send Word Now (Email Only)
      Variable Message Boards
      Digital Signs
      Voicemail System
      Safety Alert Postings

      List of Available University Notification Tools

      1. Sent Word Now (Text, Voice and Email Messaging System)
      2. Classroom Projection Override
      3. Emergency Homepage Override
      4. Facebook/Twitter
      5. Carillon
      6. Local and Area Media (Radio, TV and News)
      7. Digital Signs
      8. UD Homepage
      9. Crime Alerts
      10. PO Box Group Email System
      11. Voicemail System
      12. Safety Alert Postings

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-52

ORIGINATION DATE: April 23, 2008

REVISION DATE(S):

May 8, 2012; January 2013

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Emergency Response/Fire–Other Emergencies
Policy

Emergency Response/Fire–Other Emergencies

  1. PURPOSE
    To establish uniform procedures throughout the University for the provision of reasonable life safety for employees, students, and guests of the University in case of a fire or other emergencies.
  2. POLICY
    1. Evacuate the building. The actions listed below in sections B-1, 2, 3, and 4 should be completed using reasonable judgement and provided no persons are endangered in the process.
    2. An individual who discovers a fire or other emergency, such as abnormal heating of material, hazardous gas leaks, hazardous material or flammable liquid spill, smoke, or burning odor, shall immediately follow these procedures:
      1. Don’t risk self – leave the area if unsafe.
      2. Give the alarm by:
        1. Sounding the building evacuation alarm by pull box or, if not available, orally notifying occupants of the building.
        2. Notifying Public Safety by University telephone (911) or by an Emergency Phone.
      3. Isolate the area by closing all doors and windows.
      4. Shut down all equipment in the area if possible.
      5. Use a portable fire extinguisher to:
        1. assist oneself to evacuate,
        2. assist another to evacuate, or
        3. control a small fire, if you are properly trained.
    3. When notified of fire or other emergency alarm system or orally, personnel must evacuate the building and move to an area at least 200 feet from the building. Do not reenter the building until advised by the person in charge. Entrances, sidewalks, and driveways shall be kept clear to allow emergency vehicles and personnel access.
      1. Exception #1 to Section IIC. (This exception pertains only to a fire situation)

        If a small contained fire is discovered, the following may be done using good judgment:

        1. Evacuate the immediate area of the fire using verbal instructions.
        2. Ask for assistance from a person in the immediate area.
        3. Extinguish the fire with a portable fire extinguisher.
        4. Contact Public Safety at 911 and wait for their response.
        5. Contact Environmental Health and Safety immediately even if no appreciable damage results. This will assure that the City Fire Marshal is notified as required by law, that extinguishers are recharged, insurance reports filed, and hazardous conditions corrected to reduce the chance of recurrence.
        6. Do not allow reoccupancy of the immediate fire area until cleared by Public Safety and/or Occupational Health and Safety.
      2. Exception #2 to Section IIC. (This exception pertains only to persons with disabilities that would not permit normal evacuation from a facility.) In case of an emergency a person with a disability shall do the following:
        1. Proceed immediately to an “AREA OF REFUGE.”
        2. If an “AREA OF REFUGE” is not available proceed immediately to the nearest marked exit and wait inside the stair tower landing.
        3. Alert a responsible person of your intentions.
        4. Wait for trained emergency responders to rescue you.
      3. Faculty and other supervisory personnel who note that individuals who may have been in the building are missing, should immediately inform the Fire Department Officer in charge and/or University Police.
      4. Supervisory personnel should assist in the evacuation of persons from the building. In specific, for faculty/supervisors of persons with disabilities, note the area of refuge your student/employee has occupied and communicate this information to Public Safety at the Command Post once outside the building. Remain at the command post to provide additional information as necessary for the Fire Department.
      5. Anyone having specific information concerning the nature and/or location of the emergency condition should report this information to the Public Safety Command Post (University Police car with green light). These individuals shall remain at the Command Post until their help is requested by the Fire Department, Fire Marshal, representative of the Department of Environmental Health and Safety, or University Police.
    4. Delegation of Authority in Emergency Situations
      1. When the Fire Department responds to an emergency situation the Fire Chief or his designee has the ultimate authority for the resolution of the incident.
      2. A Fire Marshal may be called to the scene to act as a liaison to the Fire Chief. This individual is responsible for the investigation of the cause and origin of the fire as well as assuring compliance with applicable codes.
      3. When an emergency situation involves only the University Police, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety and the building occupants, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety has the ultimate authority to resolve the incident to assure the protection of human health and the environment.The University Police have responsibility for initial response and crowd control as well as enforcing directions given by the Department of EnvironmentalHealth and Safety. Building occupants/owners shall comply with directives from the Department of Environmental Health and Safety and University Police.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-06

ORIGINATION DATE: November 15, 1978

REVISION DATE(S):

September 26, 2003; June 5, 1989; October 1, 1990; May 1, 1996

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Extension Cords
Policy

Extension Cords

  1. PURPOSE
    To establish a uniform policy regarding the use of extension cords.
  2. POLICY
    All extension cord use shall comply with NFPA 70 (National Electric Code).

    1. Extension cords shall not be used as a substitute for the fixed wiring of a facility, laboratory or shop.
    2. Extension cords shall not be used for permanent or semi-permanent installations, ie, must be less than 30 days. Exception: Extension cords designed for use with portable equipment.
    3. Extension cords shall be listed by the Underwriters’ Laboratory (U.L.) and bear the U.L. label.
    4. Extension cords shall be a minimum of 16 gauge copper wire and rated for not less than 13 amperes, shall be of the grounding type (three wire) and shall not be used in excess of their rated capacity.
    5. Extension cords shall be used only in continuous lengths without splice or tap. Terminals and insulation shall be free of defects such as cracked, split or nicked insulation; exposed wires; knots; burn marks; loose connectors; or other damage that may present a fire or electrocution hazard. Destroy any extension cords showing defects.
    6. Extension cords shall not be connected in series.
    7. Extension cords shall not be used in bathrooms. Extension cords used in wet or damp areas shall be connected to a ground fault interrupter device or GFCI circuit only.
    8. For three wire extension cords, the ground prong shall not be removed. Departments shall request the installation of three prong type wall outlets where not provided.
    9. Proper polarization shall be maintained at all times.
    10. For extension cords equipped with single plug-in capability, a multiple plug adapter may be utilized provided the adapter is U.L. listed and rated for not less than 125 volts/15 amperes. Multiple plug adapters are not otherwise permitted in conjunction with an extension cord.
    11. Extension cords shall not be covered by carpeting, clothing, furniture, or other objects that could prevent adequate air circulation and cooling of the cord.
    12. Extension cords shall not be tacked, stapled or otherwise affixed in semi-permanent or permanent manner. Major appliances such as refrigerators, television sets, or other devices drawing currents for starting motors shall not be connected to an extension cord.
    13. Multi-plug devices may be used for: computer equipment, televisions, stereos, radios and similar devices. They may not be used with refrigerators, microwaves, coffee pots, hot plates toaster ovens and similar devices. Multi-plug devices must be Underwriters Laboratory approved or approved by a similar nationally recognized testing laboratory and they must contain an integral circuit breaker.

For more information regarding this policy, contact either the Department of Environmental Health and Safety at extension 8475 or the Supervisor of Electrical Services at extension 2621.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER (Legacy): 7-13

ORIGINATION DATE: April 15, 1975

REVISION DATE(S):

November 1, 1988; June 27, 1996

Policy Source Open Policy



Policy: Safety
Eye Protection Policy
Policy

Eye Protection Policy

  1. PURPOSE
    To establish an eye protection policy that protects the University community from the hazards which can lead to eye injuries.
  2. SCOPE AND APPLICATION
    This policy applies to all University personnel, contract personnel, and visitors in applicable University facilities and/or University operations.
  3. POLICY
    1. Deans, directors, chairpersons, principal investigators, laboratory instructors, and line supervisors shall assure compliance with this policy. Individuals responsible for assuring compliance with this policy shall correct infractions upon detection. Disciplinary actions shall be taken as needed.
    2. Each college, school, department, division or unit shall provide or otherwise make available to each employee required to wear eye protection the devices commensurate with the activity and hazard involved. Students may be required to purchase their own eye protection devices. For information regarding a purchase agreement for safety glasses, contact the Procurement Services at ext. 2161 or at Procurement Services.
    3. All eye protection devices used must be American National Standards Institute Z87.1 approved. This can be determined by checking for an ANSI Z87 or Z87 stamp on the frame of the glasses or goggles.
    4. Departments should develop positive reinforcement programs to encourage employees to comply with the established eye protection equipment requirements.
  4. EYE PROTECTION AREAS
    1. Eye protection shall be utilized by all individuals, including contractors, in University facilities and/or operations in which activities take place involving:
      1. Gas or electric arc welding.
      2. Hot molten metals.
      3. Heat treating, tampering or kiln firing of any metal or other material.
      4. Corrosive, toxic or explosive material.
      5. Compressed gases.
      6. UV lights and laser unless exempted by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
      7. Chemicals: liquid and/or solid.
      8. Unsealed sources of radioactive material.
      9. Infectious and potentially infectious materials.
      10. Milling, sawing, turning, shaping, cutting, grinding or stamping of any solid material.
      11. Repair or servicing of mechanical equipment which is reasonably anticipated as hazardous to the eye.
      12. Custodial, groundskeeping or other service activity reasonably anticipated as hazardous to the eye.
      13. Sports related activities which place the eye at risk to impact. Appropriate nationally recognized sporting associations can serve as a source of generally accepted standards for eye protection equipment.
      14. Any other operation involving mechanical or physical activities that are reasonably anticipated as hazardous to the eye.
    2. Every person shall wear eye protection devices when entering, participating in, observing or performing any function in connection with, any course or activity taking place in eye protection areas as defined above. Persons covered include, without limitation, administrators, faculty, staff, students, contractors, other employees and visitors.
    3. University personnel shall follow this policy when conducting University sponsored activities at other locations.
    4. Chemical goggles shall be utilized when there is a liquid splash, spray or mist hazard. Exceptions to this requirement must be approved by the Department of Environmental Health and Safety.
    5. Safety glasses shall be worn at all times in those University laboratories where eye hazards exist.
    6. Photographs taken for public relations purposes must reflect appropriate levels of eye protection for the tasks demonstrated to reflect compliance with the requirements of this policy even if the pictures are staged with non-hazardous materials.

For additional information visit Environmental Health and Safety web site.

 

Policy Details:

OWNER: Executive Vice President

SECTION: Campus Safety and Security Policies

RESPONSIBLE OFFICE: Office of Environmental Health and Safety

POLICY NUMBER: 7-23

ORIGINATION DATE: May 5, 1982

REVISION DATE(S):

June 5, 1989; November 1992; May 1, 1996; January 10, 2006; February 10, 2014

Policy Source Open Policy



ASSISTANCE

Compliance Hotline
Phone: (302) 831-2792

UD Research Office
210 Hullihen Hall
Newark, DE 19716
Phone: (302) 831-2136
Fax: (302) 831-2828
Contact us

SUBSCRIBE & CONNECT

From our latest Research Magazine to our latest discoveries, keep in touch with UD Research by signing up for our services below.

Share This