Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles

by | August 29, 2018

Smarter Textiles

ABOVE: Sagar Doshi (left) and Erik Thostenson test an elbow sleeve outfitted with one of their novel sensors. | Photo by Kathy F. Atkinson

UD engineers use carbon nanotube composite coatings

A team of engineers at the University of Delaware is developing next-generation smart textiles by creating flexible carbon nanotube composite coatings on a wide range of fibers, including cotton, nylon and wool. Their discovery is reported in the journal ACS Sensors where they demonstrate the ability to measure an exceptionally wide range of pressure – from the light touch of a fingertip to being driven over by a forklift.

Fabric coated with this sensing technology could be used in future “smart garments” where the sensors are slipped into the soles of shoes or stitched into clothing for detecting human motion.

Carbon nanotubes give this light, flexible, breathable fabric coating impressive sensing capability. When the material is squeezed, large electrical changes in the fabric are easily measured.

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