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ISSN 2150-5128
University of Delaware Research Online Magazine

ONLINE MAGAZINE VOL 8 • NO 1

University of Delaware Research Online Magazine

ONLINE MAGAZINE VOL 8 • NO 1

Disruptors

 

DISRUPTORS

MOVING FORWARD WITH AUTISM

One of every 40 children falls within the spectrum of disorders known as autism, according to a study published by Pediatrics in December 2018. They struggle—in varying amounts—with communication, social interaction and repetitive actions, and they experience our world in much different ways. Anjana Bhat’s work at the University of Delaware points to promising new dimensions in the therapies available to those with autism, adding creative motion, music and robotics to the therapist’s toolchest. Her work is helping patients build motor and communication skills.

Anjana Bhat

Anjana Bhat

Associate Professor
Department of Physical Therapy

MEET ANJANA

With skills in physical therapy, behavioral neuroscience and biomechanics, Anjana Bhat brings expansive expertise to her work developing creative therapies for those living with autism spectrum disorders. She sees movement as a critical piece of addressing the challenges ASD brings. With colleague Michele Lobo, she co-directs the Move to Learn Innovation Lab in UD’s College of Health Sciences, exploring new ways of helping children connect with their world and those in it. Using dance, yoga, music and robotics, she and her students are expanding our knowledge of effective approaches to these disorders.

Bhat earned her master’s degree at the University of Mumbai’s LTM Medical College and her Ph.D. in biomechanics and movement science at UD. She did postdoctoral research and training at the Kennedy Krieger Institute’s Center for Autism-Related Disorders and Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. In 2014, she joined UD’s faculty as associate professor of physical therapy with joint appointments in behavioral neuroscience, biomechanics and movement science.

The Centers for Disease Control reports that autism spectrum disorder affects about 1.7% of 8-year-old children in the U.S. —Centers for Disease Control
Boys are four times more likely than girls to have an autism spectrum disorder.

Question:

What do you study, and what led you into this field?

 

Answer:

I am a pediatric physical therapist and I am interested in developing creative therapies for children. For the last 17 years, I have worked with children with autism and have developed different creative interventions using musical rhythms, robot trainers and creative yoga. Most recently, in collaboration with Lynnette Overby, UD professor of theatre and dance, and her students, we have developed an eight-week dance/creative movement protocol that was administered to 13 children with autism. We are still analyzing the data to determine our results.

I always wanted to make a difference, help people, work in health care, and eventually, knew that I would like to work with special needs children. Very late in my career, I was introduced to children with autism and all the difficulties faced by their families. It is a pretty devastating diagnosis. The child and his/her family have to deal with a lot of challenges–difficulties with social interaction, communication, behavioral problems, difficulties with simple transitions in everyday activities, etc. Somehow these families are also the ones with a lot of resilience and positive attitude.

I was interested in working with them and developing engaging movement themes to promote social interaction and communication in this population. The most recent theme has been dance—it seemed like an engaging way to promote social skills.

 

Question:

Can you recount the tipping point—the idea that produced your ‘aha!’ moment?

 

Answer:

I was in my postdoc years at Johns Hopkins University. Most researchers would say that children with autism have motor impairments but nothing can be done about it. That was surprising to me. The whole focus in this population is always on their social communication difficulties and not their motor difficulties. My research has shown that you can use creative movement themes that promote both motor and social communication skills of children with autism.

 

Question:

Were there many naysayers and how did you navigate that?

 

Answer:

There is a dearth of research evidence for motor interventions in children with autism. I have not had a problem convincing parents that there is value in using creative movement activities to promote skills in children with autism. Doubts are usually cast by skeptics who don’t believe in the idea of embodied cognition. The best way to deal with that is to let the evidence speak for itself. Across many different studies we find that social skills like smiling and verbalization are substantially higher when children with autism engage in socially embedded movements versus sedentary games. So there is immense value in using themes like music and movement, yoga and dance to promote social communication, cognition and motor skills in children with autism.

 

Question:

Did anyone in particular inspire you to think differently?

 

Answer:

My mother was a teacher. I think her passion for children and their learning was most inspiring to me.

 

Question:

What has been most satisfying about your work? Most terrifying?

 

Answer:

Seeing improvements in children with autism, as they smile more, talk more and move in different ways after a round of therapy. That has been very satisfying. Our relationships with families and their support has been very satisfying.

The terrifying part is when I will no longer be able to do this work. I love the work I do.

 

Question:

What is your favorite problem at the moment?

 

Answer:

Currently, my students and I are looking at brain activation patterns during naturalistic play activities to see what sorts of games facilitate brain activation in the social brain of children with autism. We are exploring the value of cooperative building games. Eventually, we would like to use cooperative play activities to facilitate social skills in those with autism.

 

Question:

Why do you want to keep doing this work?

 

Answer:

The fact that Autism Spectrum Disorder is a very complex and challenging disorder to deal with.

The hope that we can make therapy fun and a true learning experience for children.

There cannot be a be-all, end-all treatment that works for everyone. My interest is in highlighting the features and attributes of various treatment approaches and how they may work for some children and not others..

 

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Email: Tracey Bryant

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