Recognition for biotechnology influencer

by | January 15, 2019

Kelvin Lee

ABOVE: Kelvin Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has received the 2019 Marvin J. Johnson Award in Microbial and Biochemical Technology from the American Chemical Society’s Division of Biochemical Technology. | Photo by Evan Krape

Kelvin Lee receives Marvin J. Johnson Award in Microbial and Biochemical Technology

As the director of NIIMBL, the National Institute for Innovation in Manufacturing Biopharmaceuticals, Kelvin Lee is a changemaker in the biomanufacturing industry, which has the potential to save lives, improve national security, and increase economic development in the United States.

For his impact in microbial and biochemical technology, Lee, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Delaware, has received the 2019 Marvin J. Johnson Award in Microbial & Biochemical Technology from the American Chemical Society’s Division of Biochemical Technology. He will receive the award at the spring meeting of the American Chemical Society, to be held from March 31 to April 4, 2019.

“Kelvin has the unique ability to combine scientific excellence with a level of vision and leadership quality to impact the broader biotechnology community,” said Wilfred Chen, Gore Professor of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at UD and the 2017 recipient of the Marvin J. Johnson Award.

Lee joins Chen and two other UD colleagues who have received the Marvin J. Johnson Award —Abraham Lenhoff (2011) and Eleftherios Papoutsakis (1998). UD and the University of California at Berkeley are the only two universities to have four winners of the Marvin J. Johnson Award on their faculties.

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